Hacker creates device that can wireless unlock any luxury car that uses ...

Hacker creates a $9,000 'keyless repeater' device that can wirelessly unlock any luxury car by creating an extended bridge connection to the owner's fob without their knowledge A pseudonymous hacker named 'EvanConnect' is selling a car hacking tool Called a keyless repeater, it amplifies the low frequency signal from the car that allows it to communicate with the owner's fob wherever it is He sells a base level model of the device for $9,000 and an upgraded $12,000 model that he claims could unlock any car with a wireless fob system

By Michael Thomsen For Dailymail.com

Published: 18:50 GMT, 14 February 2020 | Updated: 18:50 GMT, 14 February 2020

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A pseudonymous hacker going by the name ‘EvanConnect’ is selling a device that will let users break into any luxury car that uses a wireless key fob system.

EvanConnect demonstrated the device, called a keyless repeater, with a video released this week. 

The video shows him approaching an unattended Jeep in a parking lot and using the small handheld device with an antenna to unlock the driver’s side door of the Jeep and start the engine.

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A pseudonymous hacker named EvanConnect is advertising a keyless repeater device that he claims can be used to unlock any luxury car that uses a wireless fob system

A pseudonymous hacker named EvanConnect is advertising a keyless repeater device that he claims can be used to unlock any luxury car that uses a wireless fob system

He says the car in the video belonged to a friend who gave him permission to use it, so no crime was actually committed, but he admits there's no guarantees as to how his customers might use the device. 

In an interview with Vice, EvanConnect says he sells the base model for $9,000, which works on all luxury cars except for those that use frequencies between 22 and 40 khz, such as Mercedes, Audi, Porsche, Bentley and Rolls Royce models released after 2014.

He also offers an upgraded version for $12,000 that includes coverage of even these frequencies, effectively meaning it can unlock any car that uses a wireless fob system.

Keyless repeaters are sometimes used by security firms to test vehicle defense systems so the sale isn’t automatically illicit, and EvanConnect says his interest in the technology is purely a hobby.  

‘Honestly I can tell you that I have not stolen a car with technology,’ EvanConnect said.

‘It's very easy to do, but the way I see it, why would I get my hands dirty when I can make money just selling the tools to other people.’

The device works by picking up the low frequency wireless signal that locked cars regularly emit to detect when their owner’s fob is near.

The device re-transmits that signal at a higher frequency through a separate laptop-sized device, which can send it across much longer distances.

That allows the laptop-sized device to silently connect with the actual key fob wherever it is--in the owner’s pocket or on the side

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