Massive data leak exposes medical records, mugshots and IDs of more than 36,000 ...

Tens of thousands of files belonging to US inmates were leaked online.

Cyber security researchers discovered a bucket containing the mugshots, full names, IDs, medical records and other sensitive information of 36,077 incarcerated individuals.

JailCore, a platform used to manage correctional facilities, was left unsecure and unencrypted on an Amazon server, impacting locations in Florida, Kentucky, Missouri, Tennessee and West Virginia

The bucket was discovered by vpmMentor on January 3rd, but was not closed until nearly two weeks later – leaving enough data exposed online for cybercriminals to steal the person's identity.

Cyber security researchers discovered a bucket containing the mugshots, full names, IDs, medical records and other sensitive information of 36,077 incarcerated individuals

Cyber security researchers discovered a bucket containing the mugshots, full names, IDs, medical records and other sensitive information of 36,077 incarcerated individuals

The team explained that stealing a person's identify who is in jail can cause greater damage, as it may take some time to discover they have been scammed.

Hackers could also use their information to engage in other illegal activity such as credit card fraud and scams on families.

The data leak was first spotted on January 3rd and vpnMentor quickly reached out to JailCore directly on January 5th.

DailyMail.com has contacted JailCore for comment and has yet to receive a response. 

According to vpnMentor, JailCore refused to accept the disclosure of their findings, and demanded that the information be sent over via fax.

JailCore was left unsecure and unencrypted on an Amazon server, impacting locations in Florida, Kentucky, Missouri, Tennessee and West Virginia The bucket was discovered by vpmMentor on January 3rd, but was not closed until nearly two weeks later

JailCore was left unsecure and unencrypted on an Amazon server, impacting locations in Florida, Kentucky, Missouri, Tennessee and West Virginia The bucket was discovered by vpmMentor on January 3rd, but was not closed until nearly two weeks later

JailCore responded to the information of the data breach presented by vpnMentor with: 'We are a startup company that currently works with 6 jails totaling 1,200 inmates. Not the 36,000 mentioned in an earlier email,' JailCore told vpnMentor. 

'Of those 6 jails, only 1 is using the application to track medication compliance is a 35 inmate jail and only 5 of those 35 inmates in that jail has a prescribed medication.

'Meaning all other reports with any mention of medication were all used for demonstration purposes only.' 

'These are incarcerated individuals, not free citizens. Meaning, the same privacy laws that you and I enjoy, they do not.'

'I would implore you to get

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