YouTube hires a liaison to help it work better with creators

YouTube knows its platform can be volatile for creators. One algorithm change or an overzealous copyright claim can ruin a star's income, and the service might not even realize it. However, YouTubers now have someone on the inside. The service has

YouTube veteran (both creator and employee) Matt Kovalakides as a Head Creator Liaison who'll help creators understand the site -- and, importantly, "vice versa." There are "challenges on both sides" that neither might understand, Kovalakides said, and his goal is to bridge those gaps.

The new hire might have a lot to handle in short order. YouTubers have had a range of complaints, ranging from unexpected changes to suggestions that tank viewership through to mistaken demonetization and inconsistent policy enforcement. At the same time, YouTube hasn't always had the best time communicating its intentions, leading to creators inadvertently breaking the rules or worrying about crackdowns.

This probably won't solve all of the disagreements between YouTube and the video producers that are its bread and butter. Kovalakides is just one person and won't have a complete view of every siutation. He might help YouTube address problems before they reach crisis levels, though, and ensure that creators know where they stand before they publish their next clips.

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