Battery encased in diamonds is powered by nuclear waste that could last for ...

Imagine a cellphone that never needs to be recharged or a car battery that lasted long enough for your grandchildren to use it.

The claims come from a California-based startup that says it's cleared significant hurdles in its goal to develop a battery that could last up to 28,000 years without ever needing a charge.

The nano-diamond battery from NDB, Inc is powered by nuclear waste, but its radioactive core is protected by multiple layers of synthetic diamonds -one of the strongest material on Earth. 

Scientists say the battery emits less radioactive than the human body and is safe for use in cars, planes, phones and even pacemakers.

NDB says its nano-diamond battery could last up to 28,000 years without ever needing a charge. It's made with carbon-14, a radioactive isotope generated in nuclear power plants. But its shielded by layers and layers of synthetic diamonds, one of the hardest substances on Earth

NDB says its nano-diamond battery could last up to 28,000 years without ever needing a charge. It's made with carbon-14, a radioactive isotope generated in nuclear power plants. But its shielded by layers and layers of synthetic diamonds, one of the hardest substances on Earth

On August 25, NDB announced it had completed two proof-of-concept tests, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California and the Cavendish Laboratory at Cambridge University.  

In the lab the battery achieved a 40 percent charge, a significant improvement over solar power, which typically produce only a 15 - 20 percent charge. 

NDB believes it will be able to reach a 90 percent rate of charge.   

It's battery is powered by carbon-14, a radioactive isotope generated in the graphite blocks used to moderate reactions in nuclear power plants.

The carbon-14 is extracted and turned into tiny carbon-14 diamonds that collect and emit a charge.

Carbon-14 emits short-range radiation that is quickly absorbed by any solid material. It's dangerous to ingest or touch with your bare hands but, encased within a super-dense nano-diamond, would not leak

Carbon-14 emits short-range radiation that is quickly absorbed by any solid material. It's dangerous to ingest or touch with your bare hands but, encased within a super-dense nano-diamond, would not leak

They're then shielded with multiple protective layers of synthetic diamond, one of the hardest materials on Earth. 

The energy from the isotope is absorbed in the diamond through a process called inelastic scattering, which is used to generate electricity. 

Any excess

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