China's Long March 4B rocket booster explodes and crashes into town

China's Long March 4B rocket booster explodes into a massive cloud of orange smoke after crashing into a nearby town and narrowly missing a school China launched its Long March 4B rocket carrying a satellite into orbit Monday Shortly after the launch, the rocket booster was spotted falling back to Earth The booster veered off course and headed towards a nearby town Just missing a school, the craft crashed and exploded into a massive cloud 

By Stacy Liberatore For Dailymail.com

Published: 18:39 BST, 7 September 2020 | Updated: 19:03 BST, 7 September 2020

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China launched its Long March 4B rocket Monday, sending an Earth observation satellite to orbit - but the booster’s return was not so successful.

Footage released after the launch shows the booster falling back to Earth, narrowly missing a school, before crashing and exploding in a nearby town.

The horrifying scene was captured near the Lilong village, Gaoyao Town in the Luonan county of Shaanxi province and the video surfaced on the Chinese social media site Weibo.

The booster was seen quickly falling from space, with bystanders yelling in the background after realized it had traveled off path and was heading towards a school.

China launched its Long March 4B rocket Monday, sending an Earth observation satellite to orbit - but the booster¿s return was not so successful. Footage released after the launch shows the booster falling back to Earth, narrowly missing a school, before crashing and exploding in a nearby town

China launched its Long March 4B rocket Monday, sending an Earth observation satellite to orbit - but the booster’s return was not so successful. Footage released after the launch shows the booster falling back to Earth, narrowly missing a school, before crashing and exploding in a nearby town

China launched its remote sensing satellite, called Gaofen-11 (2), Monday morning, which will be used in land census, urban planning, road network design, crop estimation and disaster prevention, Space.com reported.

The satellite joins China’s High-resolution Earth Observation System, which began in 2010 and launched the first device in 2013.

China has kept a tight lid on its satellite constellation, but footage of the first Gaofen 11 in 2018 and previous footage

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