'Vertical garden' high-rise in Australia will be dred in more than 20,000 trees ...

A residential tower in Australia will take green living to new heights.

Urban Forest, a 30-story high-rise in South Brisbane, will be covered in a 'vertical garden' of over 20,000 trees and plants, more than five times the greenery found in a nearby park.

Raised up on large 'tree trunk' columns, the latest masterpiece from Sydney-based architect Koichi Takada includes 382 apartments, with sculpturesque stepped facades and extended balconies offering plenty of outdoor time.

Plans incorporate solar panels, rainwater collection units, and a two-story rooftop garden, as well as a sheltered space on the ground level that will serve as a small public park.

The overall design is intended to maximize natural light and cross-ventilation, while the foliage will also provide natural insulation.

Urban Forest, a 30-story high-rise in Brisbane, Australia, will be covered in a 'vertical garden' of over 20,000 trees and plants. That's more than five times the greenery found in nearby Musgrave Park

Urban Forest, a 30-story high-rise in Brisbane, Australia, will be covered in a 'vertical garden' of over 20,000 trees and plants. That's more than five times the greenery found in nearby Musgrave Park

A 'green spine' connecting the Southbank Parklands with Musgrave Park, Urban Forest will increase biodiversity and reduce Brisbane's ecological footprint. 

'Urban Forest achieves 300 percent site cover with living greenery, featuring 1,000 plus trees and more than 20,000 plants selected from 259 native species,' the firm said in a statement, according to Design Boom. 

'This is more than five times the number of trees found in nearby Musgrave Park.' 

The structure is being touted as the world's greenest residential building, with developers aiming for a 6-star green star rating, equivalent to LEED platinum certification.

'Urban forest is probably the greenest we can design with the current 'greening'  tools and regulations available to us,' said Takada, who wants building design to shift from mass production to 'mass greening.'  

Urban Forest will include a two-story rooftop garden that will be fed by rainwater collection technology. Solar panels and sustainable and recycled building materials will also help make it the world's greenest residential building

Urban Forest will include a two-story rooftop garden that will be fed by rainwater collection technology. Solar panels and sustainable and recycled building materials will also help make it the world's greenest residential building

The ongoing pandemic 'is a great opportunity to pause and rethink and not just adapt, but shift the paradigm from industrial to natural,' he said.

'Concrete, steel and glass are very hard and solid industrial materials. Let's call them dead

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