Children who pass 'the marshmallow test' are not just after a treat, but also a ...

Children who pass 'the marshmallow test' are not just after a treat, but also a boost in reputation among authority figures, study reveals Stanford's 1972 'marshmallow test' is used to measure a child's success in life Children are given one marshmallow and told they can eat it right away But if they wait a while, while nobody is watching, they can have two instead Experts recently conducted the test again but this time told children that they can eat the marshmallow or wait and their teach will know how long they waited The team found that children waited twice as long as those not in the group 

By Stacy Liberatore For Dailymail.com

Published: 23:54 BST, 9 September 2020 | Updated: 23:54 BST, 9 September 2020

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The marshmallow test is a well-known piece of social science researcher used to determine a child's ability to delay gratification, which is said to indicate success later in life.

A team revisited the 1972 Stanford experiment and found that it may not be the treat children care about, but how authority figures see them.

A group of preschool students were separated in two group, with one being told their teach would find out how long they waited for a sweet and the other was told it was their classmates.

Those in the 'teacher condition' group were found to wait twice as long, suggesting that when children made the decision to hold back they saw a boost in reputation as part of the reward. 

The marshmallow test is a well-known piece of social science researcher used to determine a child's ability to delay gratification, which is said to indicate success later in life. A team revisited the 1972 Stanford experiment and found that it may not be the treat children care about, but how authority figures see them

The marshmallow test is a well-known piece of social science researcher used to determine a child's ability to delay gratification, which is said to indicate success later in life. A team revisited the 1972 Stanford experiment and found that it may not be the treat children care about, but how authority figures see them

The marshmallow test has been used to measure a child's ability of self-control by seeing how long they can delay gratification.

In the original Stanford experiment, children are given one marshmallow and told they can eat it right away or, if they wait a while, while nobody is watching, they can have two marshmallows instead.

However, a team at the University of California, San Diego wanted to see if there was more to it than a child wanted a treat.

Gail Heyman, a University of California San Diego professor of psychology and lead author on the study, said: 'The classic marshmallow test has shaped the way researchers think about the development of self-control, which is an important skill.'

A group of preschool students were separated in two group, with one being told their teach would find out how long they waited for a sweet and the other was told it was their classmates. Those in the 'teacher condition' group were found to wait twice as long, suggesting that when children made the decision to hold back they saw a boost in reputation as part of the reward

A group of preschool students were separated in two group, with one being told their teach would find out how long they waited for a sweet and the other was told it was their classmates. Those in the 'teacher condition' group were found to wait twice as long, suggesting that when children made the decision to hold back they saw a boost in reputation as part of the reward

'Our new research suggests that in addition to measuring self-control, the task may also be

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