Exo-planets orbiting carbon-rich stars may be made of DIAMONDS

Exo-planets orbiting carbon-rich stars may be made of DIAMONDS due to extreme heat and pressure on these distant worlds Exoplanets circling carbon-rich stars could be mainly diamond and silica, scientists say They subjected silicon carbide and water to extreme heat and pressure The sample turned into diamond, confirming their theory Because they lack geological activity, diamond planets are unlikely to host life 

By Dan Avery For Dailymail.com

Published: 23:34 BST, 14 September 2020 | Updated: 23:34 BST, 14 September 2020

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Scientists have increasing evidence that some distant planets are made of diamonds.

Stars like the Sun, with lower carbon to oxygen ratios, are typically orbited by planets composed of water and granite, with very low diamond content. 

But planets circling stars with higher carbon ratios tend to be carbon-rich themselves and under the right conditions that carbon can become diamond.

To test their theory, researchers subjected a sample of silicon carbide immersed in water to intense pressure and heat using lasers and X-ray measurements.

As expected, the silicon carbide converted into diamond and silica. 

While Earth is composed of mainly water and granite, exoplanets orbiting carbon-rich stars are made of diamond and silica, according to research from Arizona State University

While Earth is composed of mainly water and granite, exoplanets orbiting carbon-rich stars are made of diamond and silica, according to research from Arizona State University

'These exoplanets are unlike anything in our solar system,' says lead author Harrison Allen-Sutter of Arizona State University's School of Earth and Space Exploration. 

His team re-created the interior of one of these planets using a diamond-anvil cell at ASU's Lab for Earth and Planetary Materials. 

In a diamond-anvil cell, two gem-quality single crystal diamonds are shaped into anvils and faced toward each other. 

A sample - in this case silicon carbide immersed in water - is then loaded between the flat surfaces of the diamond and compressed under high pressure. 

In a diamond-anvil cell, two gem-quality diamonds are shaped into anvils and faced toward each other. In the experiment, a sample of silicon carbide immersed in water was loaded between the  flat diamond heads and subjected to immense pressure, then exposed to laser heating. As expected, the sample turned into diamond and silica

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