Thousands of bats captured on radar as they fly into the night looking for ...

Dinner time! Thousands of bats are captured on weather radar as they fly into the night looking for insects in Arizona The National Weather Service captured a massive colony of bats on radar Thousands of creatures were captured before dusk in Arizona Sunday The radar shows what looks like fireworks bursting over the area Officials believe it was a colony of Mexican free-tailed bats looking for insects 

By Stacy Liberatore For Dailymail.com

Published: 16:28 BST, 15 September 2020 | Updated: 17:32 BST, 15 September 2020

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Thousands of bats woke from their slumber and flew out of a tunnel in Arizona to feast before dusk – and the National Weather Service captured the event on radar.

The organization picked up the massive colony in Phoenix Sunday, which highlighted what appears to be a burst like fireworks coming from a single point.

Officials believe it was a colony of Mexican free-tailed bats that dispersed in search of insects around the city.

There are 28 bat species living in Arizona, but the Mexican free-tailed does the most pest control around the state – some roosts contains millions that consume 250 tons of insects in a night.

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Thousands of bats woke from their slumber and flew out of a tunnel in Arizona to feast before dusk – and the National Weather Service captured the event on radar. The organization picked up the massive colony in Phoenix Sunday, which highlighted what appears to be a burst like fireworks coming from a single point

Thousands of bats woke from their slumber and flew out of a tunnel in Arizona to feast before dusk – and the National Weather Service captured the event on radar. The organization picked up the massive colony in Phoenix Sunday, which highlighted what appears to be a burst like fireworks coming from a single point

The National Weather Service (NWS) picked up the colony Sunday evening just before dusk.

Officials were initially perplexed by the bursting motion on the radar, but determined it was a result of flapping animals in the sky.

NWS meteorologist Sean Benedict, told AZFamily: ‘That doesn’t look like a normal shower, the way everything is sort of fanning out.’

‘They don’t really have a uniform direction. That’s usually your clue initially that it’s probably animals flying around.’

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