Scientists develop a prosthetic hand that is able to restore over 90 per cent ...

A prosthetic hand that can grip and move like a normal hand could restore over 90 per cent of functionality to people with upper-limb amputations, developers claim.  

A team of orthopedists, industrial designers and patients worked with scientists from the Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, , on the artificial hand named Hannes.

The limb was designed to accurately replicate the size, weight, appearance, and natural grasping motion of a human hand to help people gain near normal control.

Researchers claim Hannes is ready for market and has been given regulatory approval. The team are now working to find investors to make it a reality. 

Hannes has the ability to replicate the key biological properties of the human hand - natural and adaptable movement, levels of force and speed and grasp robustness.  

A prosthetic hand that can grip and move like a normal hand could restore over 90 per cent of functionality to people with upper-limb amputations, developers claim

A prosthetic hand that can grip and move like a normal hand could restore over 90 per cent of functionality to people with upper-limb amputations, developers claim 

The limb was designed to accurately replicate the size, weight, appearance, and natural grasping motion of a human hand to help people gain near normal control

The limb was designed to accurately replicate the size, weight, appearance, and natural grasping motion of a human hand to help people gain near normal control

Researchers claim Hannes is ready for market and has been given regulatory approval. The team are now working to find investors to make it a reality

Researchers claim Hannes is ready for market and has been given regulatory approval. The team are now working to find investors to make it a reality

It has been designed to resemble a human hand and wrist, is soft and has the ability to dynamically adapt itself to the shape of objects the wearer wants to grasp. 

'It is uniquely similar to a human hand and, being developed directly with patients, it is of practical use,' according to its developers.

A pilot trial involved amputees found that the volunteers could autonomously use Hannes to perform activities linked to daily living after less than a week of training. 

It can be worn all day and is adjustable to different upper limb impairments, according to the development team. 

Hannes includes an array of sensors placed with a custom socket that detects the activity of any residual limb muscles in the lower or higher part of the arm.

These are actively contracted by the user to perform multiple movements.  

A mobile phone app and bluetooth connection can also be used to adjust the

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