Bomb sniffing robot redesigned to 'smell' coronavirus from breath

A California startup is working on transforming a bomb sniffing robot into a device that detects coronavirus that claims to be faster than traditional testing.

Koniku altered its Konikore device to detect Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC's) from breath, which is common for those infected with the virus.

The 'smell cyborg' mimics the look of a flying saucer and has a chip programmed to detect a certain scent, which triggers lights when it is identified.

Oshiorenoya Agabi, Koniku CEO, told DailyMail.com: 'Our first products will be delivered to customers before the end of the year.'

'There are a variety of use cases for the Konikore, including hospitality, entertainment, transportation, logistics, defense, manufacturing and food.' 

Scroll down for video 

A California startup is working on transforming a bomb sniffing robot into a device that detects coronavirus that claims to be faster than traditional testing. Koniku altered its Konikore device to detect Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC's) from breath, which is common for those infected with the virus

A California startup is working on transforming a bomb sniffing robot into a device that detects coronavirus that claims to be faster than traditional testing. Koniku altered its Konikore device to detect Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC's) from breath, which is common for those infected with the virus

The smell cyborg was initially designed in partnership with Airbus, which would place the device on planes and throughout airports to help identify explosives and other potentially hazardous materials.

This version, according to Airbus has a response time of under 10 seconds ‘in best conditions.’

However, with the US still battling the coronavirus, Koniku is using its powers to help keep the virus at bay.

‘Our goal is to have a device that merges synthetic biology with silicon and maps all of the smells of human life on a global scale,' Agabi told Bloomberg.

‘We should have a device in every home in America to screen for disease.’

The 'smell cyborg' mimics the look of a flying saucer and has a chip programmed to detect a certain scent, which triggers lights when it is identified

The 'smell cyborg' mimics the look of a flying saucer and has a chip programmed to detect a certain scent, which triggers lights when it is identified

read more from dailymail.....

PREV Tesla update lets vehicles drive through green lights automatically
NEXT 'Risky drinking' is found to increase among women in their 50s and 60s, study ...