Just in time for Halloween! Spiderweb large enough to catch a HUMAN is spotted ...

A giant spiderweb has been discovered by conservation officials in Missouri that is large enough to 'catch people if they walk through it at night.'

The Missouri Department of Conservation says it was spun by a spotted orb-weaver, which is a barn spider that builds webs late summer and fall.

These creatures have an abdomen with a pattern that resembles an upside-down spruce tree and they typically grown about a half of an inch – not including the legs.

The human-size web spans across two trees and officials note that it was likely created starting in the early hours of the day.

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A giant spiderweb has been discovered by conservation officials in Missouri that is large enough to 'catch people if they walk through it at night. The human-size web spans across two trees and officials note that it was likely created starting in the early hours of the day

A giant spiderweb has been discovered by conservation officials in Missouri that is large enough to 'catch people if they walk through it at night. The human-size web spans across two trees and officials note that it was likely created starting in the early hours of the day

Francis Skalicky, media specialist with Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC), spotted the massive web on a trail in Springfield.

Orb-weavers, although large and hairy, are generally harmless to human and prefer to feast on insects such as moths and crane flies.

'Many orb-weavers are nocturnal and have the peculiar habit of eating and rebuilding their webs each day,' the conservation department shared on its website.

'Webs are built at dusk and used for snaring prey during the night.

The Missouri Department of Conservation says it was spun by a spotted orb-weaver, which is a barn spider that builds webs late summer and fall

The Missouri Department of Conservation says it was spun by a spotted orb-weaver, which is a barn spider that builds webs late summer and fall

'At dawn, the spider reingests the strands (along with moisture that has collected on it as dew) and recycles the nutrients in making the next web.'

MDC shared in the image of the intricate web on its Facebook page, which sparked a number of emotions among users.

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