Pig fat used to grow jawbones in FIVE weeks could help millions suffering with ...

Pig fat used to grow jawbones in just FIVE weeks could help the millions of people suffering with joint dysfunction Liposuction was used to extract fat from Yucatan minipigs for this study The team separated the stems cells and programmed them to grow into bones  The cells were placed in a mold made from cow bones and grew  in five weeks Researchers inserted the newly grown bones into live pigs for six months They found that the bone had taken the place of the original structure in the jaw 

By Stacy Liberatore For Dailymail.com

Published: 20:08 BST, 15 October 2020 | Updated: 20:13 BST, 15 October 2020

2

View
comments

Researchers from Columbia University have successfully grown a jawbone from pig fat in a bid to help the nearly 10 million people in the US suffering with jaw joint dysfunction.

Liposuction was used to extract fat from a live animal, allowing the team to isolate the stem cells that were then enlarged in culture to gather a sufficient number to create a large transplant.

The team programmed the cells to turn into bone and placed them in a mold that is shaped like the temporomandibular, which is the bone in the jaw linked to dysfunction – and it grew in just five weeks.

The bones were implanted into pigs that had their jawbones removed and following the operation, the animals were able to eat right away.

Scroll down for video 

The team programmed the cells to turn into bone and placed them in a mold that is shaped like the temporomandibular, which is the bone in the jaw linked to dysfunction – and it grew in just five weeks

The team programmed the cells to turn into bone and placed them in a mold that is shaped like the temporomandibular, which is the bone in the jaw linked to dysfunction – and it grew in just five weeks 

'The temporomandibular joint (TMJ), which forms the back portion of the lower jaw and connects your jaw to your skull, is an anatomically complex and highly loaded structure consisting of cartilage and bone,' researchers shared in a statement.

'About 10 million people in the United States alone suffer from TMJ dysfunction due to birth defects, trauma, or disease.'

'Current treatments range from steroid injections that provide only a temporary pain relief, to surgical reconstructions using either prosthetic devices or donor tissue, and often fail to provide long-lasting repair.'

With this in mind, the team at Columbia University set out to find a better way to treat these problems.

The temporomandibular joint (TMJ), which forms the back portion of the lower jaw and connects your jaw to your skull, is an anatomically complex and highly loaded structure consisting of cartilage and bone

The temporomandibular joint (TMJ), which forms the back portion

read more from dailymail.....