Scientists predict the food of 2030 on World Food Day

Scientists have shared their predictions for the food of 2030, from insect toppings and meat grown in the lab, to vegan food for our pets.   

Experts from around the world have been speaking during an online event as part of the Oxford Science and Ideas Festival to mark World Food Day on Friday. 

One Dutch scientist says lab-grown meat will knock plant burgers off the shelves, while another Australian animal expert thinks it's time to seriously consider vegan pet food.

And an Oxford psychologist thinks 2030 will bring sensory dining experiences to people's homes that were only previously found in high-end restaurants.    

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Pictured, cricket protein power added to a stew. Insect-based protein is growing globally with smaller environmental impacts than meat

Pictured, cricket protein power added to a stew. Insect-based protein is growing globally with smaller environmental impacts than meat

'Food is going to change more in the next 10 years than it has in 10,000 years, due to new innovations in food technologies and biotechnologies,' said Ryan Bethencourt, CEO at dog food company Wild Earth. 

'I think we're going to see multiple million dollar companies in the plant-based space.'

It's possible that climatic and environmental changes and 'ecological devastation' will force a cultural shift toward lifestyles that respect the planet’s resources, rather than exploiting them.  

MailOnline has provided a breakdown of some of the most outlandish predictions for the diets and dining habits of the Earthlings of 2030.  

 IN VITRO MEAT

Lab-grown meat is set to become more ubiquitous in the next 10 years, transforming from a niche concept to a common fridge staple. 

Professor Mark Post at Maastricht University in the Netherlands unveiled the world's first lab-grown burger from cow muscle cells, in 2013.

He's now pioneering a 'kinder and cleaner' way of making beef with his firm, Mosa Meat, which created the world's first hamburger without slaughtering an animal. 

The company extracts cells from the muscle of an animal, such as a cow for beef, when the animal is under anaesthesia.  

Dutch company Mosa Meat made the world’s first lab-grown meat burger back in 2013, Pictured, an uncooked Mosa Meat patty

Dutch company Mosa Meat made the world’s first lab-grown meat burger back in 2013, Pictured, an uncooked Mosa Meat patty

The cells then are placed in a dish containing nutrients and naturally-occurring growth factors, and allowed to proliferate just as they would inside an animal, until there are trillions of cells from a small sample. 

These cells later form muscle cells, which naturally merge to form primitive muscle fibres and edible tissue.  

From one sample from a cow, the firm can produce 800 million strands of muscle tissue, which is enough to make 80,000 quarter pounders. 

Mosa Meat has also created cultured fat that it adds to its tissue to form the finished product, which simply tastes 'like meat', the company says. 

Professor Post think this product will be so popular with animal welfare activists and burger fans alike it will eventually displace plant-based substitutes, like soy burgers, that are increasingly common in UK supermarkets. 

'Novel technologies such as the ones developed in cellular agriculture are part of the solution, next to reducing food waste and changing consumer behaviour,' Professor Post told MailOnline. 

The cooked Mosa Meat patty looks similar to conventionally-made beef burgers. The company says it tastes 'like meat'

The cooked Mosa Meat patty looks similar to conventionally-made beef burgers. The company says it tastes 'like meat'

'A good example of strong trend in consumer behaviour is increased vegetarianism among young generations to unprecedented numbers. 

'Most likely, this trend will continue and spread towards other age groups and eventually will lead to disappearance of plant-based meat substitutes.'

Mosa Meat received $55 million in funding last month to scale up production of cultured meat. 

The funding will help extend the firm's current pilot production facility in the Dutch city of Maastricht and develop an industrial-sized production line.  

'SONIC SEASONING'  

Sonic seasoning is a relatively new term describing the use of audio stimulus to enhance our experience of eating – most famously used in British chef Heston Blumenthal's three Michelin starred restaurant The Fat Duck in Berkshire. 

At the Fat Duck, diners in the past have listened to the sounds of the sea through an iPod while eating a seafood course to 'enhance the sense of taste'.  

Professor Charles Spence, Head of Oxford University's Crossmodal Research Laboratory thinks there could be more digital technology at the family dining room table – not just at posh restaurants. 

Heston Blumenthal's Sounds of the Sea dish, which consists of sashimi, tapioca ‘sand’ and sea foam, served with a conch shell containing an iPod gently playing the sounds of sea gulls and waves falling against the sand

Heston Blumenthal's Sounds of the Sea dish, which consists of sashimi, tapioca ‘sand’ and sea foam, served with a conch shell containing an iPod gently playing the sounds of sea gulls and waves falling against the sand

Dining will go 'hand in hand' with deviices, he believes, and 'sonic seasoning' will involve music and soundscapes to digitally enrich and season our food and drink.  

'Whatever the future of food, it will undoubtedly be more playful, experiential, and multisensory,' he told MailOnline 

'There's been a huge expansion of pairing music with flavour, part of our broader interest in pairing sensations – food and drink, flavour and sound,' he said.

According to hospitality company HGEM, low frequency sounds can add the perception of a bitterness to food, and higher frequencies bring sweetness. 

Exaggerated sound effects like the scrunch of a crisp packet and the fizz of a carbonated drink as it's poured into a glass of ice-cubes can make them seem fresher. 

In the years ahead, we will be eating off our tablet-plate hybrids, which may recognise and identify different mouthfulls or hors d'oeuvres, and using augmented reality (AR) to help us choose what to eat. 

AR – which overlays computer-generated objects on real-world environment – could help give us a better impression of the size of a item on a food menu on delivery apps like Deliveroo or Uber Eats. 

The technology could also enhance food's

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