All seven planets will be visible in the night sky this week

The solar system will put on a show for sky watchers this week, with all seven planets beyond Earth visible in the night sky at some point over the next seven days.

Venus will be the brightest of the worlds, but Mercury, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn will be visible to the naked eye and Uranus and Neptune visible with binoculars. 

Mars, Saturn and Jupiter will be best viewed in the evenings and, assuming the clouds hold off and the sky is clear, Venus will be unmissable in the morning sky.

Without a telescope or binoculars, all the planets apart from Neptune and Uranus will all appear as stars, or points of light against the dark night or early morning sky.

Neptune will be barely visible with binoculars or a small telescope about 9 hours after sunset, Uranus will 'just' be visible with the unaided eye on a very dark night. 

Mercury will be visible just above the horizon just before dawn, and almost directly above it will be the much brighter Venus. To the left of this image is the bright star Arcturus and to the right is Spica, one of the brightest star systems in the sky

Mercury will be visible just above the horizon just before dawn, and almost directly above it will be the much brighter Venus. To the left of this image is the bright star Arcturus and to the right is Spica, one of the brightest star systems in the sky

Venus and Mercury will be best viewed in the morning sky, just before dawn and Venus will be the third brightest celestial body after the Sun and Moon.

To find Mercury you first need to look for Venus - it's the brightest 'star' in the sky -  then look down, close to the horizon. 

Venus outshines Mercury by 70 times, so it will be considerably fainter than Earth's sister planet and mainly visible in the northern hemisphere.   

According to EarthSky, Mercury will be best viewed on an unobstructed horizon an hour before sunrise - ideally with binoculars but it should be visible to the naked eye.

As the month goes on Mercury, the closest planet to the Sun, will gradually become brighter by the day and climb higher in the sky, staying out longer before sunset. 

Mars and Jupiter will come out as night begins to fall - with Mars appearing as the brightest 'star in the eastern half of the sky and Jupiter the brightest in the west.

The crescent Hunter's Moon, will make it easier to spot the gas giant planets Jupiter and Saturn - with Jupiter easily the brightest of the two. 

It's named a Hunter's Moon due to the time of year and its association with Native American tribes using the full moon in October/November to gather food.

It will now begin to get smaller as the month goes on, leading to darker skies, making otherwise hard to spot planets more visible to the naked eye. 

When the sky gets darker into the

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