Looking at urban landscapes can overload you brain and cause you to walk ...

City dwellers AREN'T always in a rush: Study shows looking at urban landscapes can overload you brain and cause you to walk slower Volunteers were asked to look at pictures of nature and urban landscapes They were walking on a treadmill and the pictures were projects in front of them When looking at urban images people walked more slowly due to distractions 

By Victoria Allen Science Correspondent For The Daily Mail

Published: 00:00 GMT, 6 January 2021 | Updated: 00:00 GMT, 6 January 2021

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City life is often seen as fast-paced, with those caught up in the rat race always in a rush but urbanites may actually walk more slowly than country folk, study shows.

In an experiment, researchers led by the University of Bristol asked 20 people to walk up and down a 15-metre (50-foot) room while looking at pictures of nature scenes or urban areas.  

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They found that urbanites may actually walk more slowly because they are so distracted by the built-up world around them. 

Being surrounded by nature appears to make people walk more quickly, because it is simpler to process than the vast array of cars, buildings and flashy visual distractions in the city.

In an experiment, researchers led by the University of Bristol asked 20 people to walk up and down a 15-metre (50-foot) room while looking at pictures of nature scenes or urban areas

In an experiment, researchers led by the University of Bristol asked 20 people to walk up and down a 15-metre (50-foot) room while looking at pictures of nature scenes or urban areas

When looking at a cityscape, people walked around 0.02 miles per hour more slowly on average, the study found.

Their steps were also an average of one centimetre (0.4 inches) shorter.

Urban environments take up brainpower, because there is so much to look at, experts suspect.

Just as people tend to go more slowly when walking and talking at the same time, they may be held up by the effort of looking at everything within a city or town.

Daria Burtan, lead author of the study from the School of Psychological

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