Archaeology: Jawbone of huge canine from 1.8 MILLION years ago with human ...

Archaeology: Jawbone of huge canine from 1.8 MILLION years ago with human ...
Archaeology: Jawbone of huge canine from 1.8 MILLION years ago with human ...
Is this Europe's first hunting dog? Jawbone of a huge canine dating back 1.8 MILLION years is discovered alongside human remains in Georgia The jawbone of a young adult Eurasian hunting dog was found in Dmanisi  Experts have dated the dog's remains back to around 1.77–1.76 million years ago This predates the widespread dispersal of hunting dogs from Asia into Europe Its finds also suggests that the dogs lived alongside early humans in Georgia

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The jawbone of a huge canine from 1.8 million years ago has been found alongside human remains in Georgia — and may be Europe's first hunting dog, a study claimed.

Experts led from the University of Florence analysed remains freshly collected from the Dmanisi archaeological site, which previously yielded several hominin skulls.

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They concluded that the remains belong to the species Canis (Xenocyon) lycaonoides — the 'Eurasian hunting dog' — which originated in East Asia.

The Dmanisi dog, the team said, could be the ancestor of African hunting dogs — and likely lived alongside early humans in Georgia before dispersing more widely.

The jawbone of a huge canine from 1.8 million years ago has been found alongside human remains in Georgia — and may be Europe's first hunting dog, a study claimed. Pictured: an artist's impression of a pack of Eurasian hunting dogs chasing prey

The jawbone of a huge canine from 1.8 million years ago has been found alongside human remains in Georgia — and may be Europe's first hunting dog, a study claimed. Pictured: an artist's impression of a pack of Eurasian hunting dogs chasing prey

Researchers have concluded that the remains (pictured) belong to the species Canis (Xenocyon) lycaonoides — the 'Eurasian hunting dog' — which originated in East Asia

Researchers have concluded that the remains (pictured) belong to the species Canis (Xenocyon) lycaonoides — the 'Eurasian hunting dog' — which originated in East Asia

ABOUT DMANISI

Dmanisi is a an archaeological site in the Kvemo Kartli region of Georgia.

It dates back 1.8 million years and has produced the first direct evidence of early humans outside Africa. 

These specimens — including several skulls and four skeletons — have been identified as early examples of the species Homo erectus. 

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The study of the large dog's remains was undertaken by vertebrate palaeontologist Saverio Bartolini-Lucenti of the University of Florence, Italy, and his colleagues.

According to their analysis, the bones date back to between 1.77–1.76 million years ago — making it the earliest known case of a

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