Children engage more with stories if they're read from a real book, study claims

Children engage more with stories if they're read from a real book, study claims
Children engage more with stories if they're read from a real book, study claims
Ditch the tablet at bedtime! Children engage more with stories if they're read from a real book, study claims Children engage more with stories read from a book rather than a tablet - study It found that parents talked more to their children when reading them a real book Youngsters also responded more to this conversation than if a tablet was used Researchers at the University of Michigan studied 72 parents and their children 

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Many families with young children now own a tablet and some use them for bedtime stories or as an educational tool to help youngsters learn.

But a new study suggests that it may be time to ditch the devices for such use, after finding that children actually engage more with stories if they're read from a real book. 

Researchers in the US compared the use of tablets with traditional children's books in a study involving 72 parents with young children aged 24 to 36 months.

They found that parents talked more to their children when reading them a real book, while children also responded more to this conversation than if a tablet was used.

A new study suggests that it may be time to ditch tablets for bedtime reading, after finding that children actually engage more with stories if they're read from a real book (stock image)

A new study suggests that it may be time to ditch tablets for bedtime reading, after finding that children actually engage more with stories if they're read from a real book (stock image)

WHY ARE GIRLS BETTER THAN BOYS AT READING AND WRITING?

Research shows that girls typically score better than boys in standardised literacy tests.

The trend is seen as early as age 10 and continues until the age of 18.

Previous research has shown women and men use their brains differently.

Girls use both brain hemispheres for reading and writing, while boys typically rely on just one.

Boys are also exhibit more disruptive behaviours than girls in the classroom.

They are more likely to be inattentive and interrupt teachers.

Scientists also suggest that reading and language are seen as feminine skills, even from a young age.

This means boys are less likely than girls to push to improve these skills. 

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