Chimpanzees do not automatically know what to do when they come across nuts

Chimpanzees do not automatically know what to do when they come across nuts
Chimpanzees do not automatically know what to do when they come across nuts
Cracking chimpanzee culture: Apes do NOT automatically know what to do when they come across nuts and stones and must learn the complex behaviour from others, study reveals Apes don't automatically know what to do when they come across nuts or stones That is the finding of a new study carried out by University of Zurich researchers Experts concluded that chimpanzees must learn complex behaviour from others They said it shows that ape culture is more similar to humans than often assumed

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Chimpanzees do not automatically know what to do when they come across nuts and stones and must learn the complex behaviour from others, a study has found.

Researchers said their discovery shows that ape culture is more similar to humans than previously thought, whereby skills accumulate over generations and become increasingly efficient or complex.

The study found that a group of wild chimpanzees did not crack nuts when provided with stone tools, even though a separate, nearby community of the apes were using them.

This suggests that the use of tools is not easily picked up by wild chimpanzees, the researchers said, and may hint that this behaviour has to be socially learned.

Chimpanzees do not automatically know what to do when they come across nuts and stones and must learn the complex behaviour from others, a study has found

Chimpanzees do not automatically know what to do when they come across nuts and stones and must learn the complex behaviour from others, a study has found

WHICH ARE SMARTER: CHIMPS OR KIDS?

Most children surpass the intelligence levels of chimpanzees before they reach four years old.

A study conducted by Australian researchers in June 2017 tested children for foresight, which is said to distinguish humans from animals.

The experiment saw researchers drop a grape through the top of a vertical plastic Y-tube.

They then monitored the reactions of a child and chimpanzee in their efforts to grab the grape at the other end, before it hit the floor.

Because there were two possible ways the grape could exit the pipe, researchers looked at the strategies the children and chimpanzees used to predict where the grape would go.

The apes and the two-year-olds only covered a single hole with their hands when tested.

But by four years of age, the children had developed to a level where they knew how to forecast the outcome.

They covered the holes with both hands, catching whatever was dropped through every time.

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Humans learn to use tools and other skills from watching each other but there is an ongoing debate about whether this type of cumulative culture is unique. 

Previous experiments with captive apes have found that they begin to use tools without being taught, but some scientists say the animals observe humans using tools and may learn this behaviour from them.

Professor Kathelijne Koops, of the University of Zurich (UZH), carried out a long-running field experiment in the Nimba

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