Tuesday 17 May 2022 02:40 PM 'Deep ocean' water will warm by a further 0.36°F in the next 50 years, ... trends now

Tuesday 17 May 2022 02:40 PM 'Deep ocean' water will warm by a further 0.36°F in the next 50 years, ... trends now
Tuesday 17 May 2022 02:40 PM 'Deep ocean' water will warm by a further 0.36°F in the next 50 years, ... trends now

Tuesday 17 May 2022 02:40 PM 'Deep ocean' water will warm by a further 0.36°F in the next 50 years, ... trends now

'Deep ocean' water more than 2,300ft below the surface will warm by a further 0.36°F in the next 50 years as it continues to absorb 'excess heat' created by humans, scientists predict Oceans have absorbed about 90 per cent of the warming caused by humans Much of this heat is stored in the 'deep ocean' – 2,300ft below the surface Study found 62% of the warming from 1850 to 2018 is held in the deep ocean  Temperature increase could devastate ecosystems and raise sea levels

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The deep ocean could warm by a further 0.36°F (0.2°C) in the next 50 years, as it continues to absorb the vast majority of 'excess heat' created by humans, a new study warns.

Oceans have already absorbed about 90 per cent of the warming caused by humans since the Industrial Revolution began. 

Much of this heat is stored in the 'deep ocean' – defined as water more than 2,300ft (700m) below the surface.

The resulting underwater temperature increase could cause sea levels to rise and have devastating consequences for ecosystems, the researchers from the University of Exeter and the University of Brest warn.

Deep-sea plants and animals which depend on oxygen may no longer be able to survive, and the change will also affect the sea's currents and chemistry.

Much of the 'excess heat' stored in the subtropical North Atlantic is in the deep ocean, below 2,300ft, new research suggests.

Much of the 'excess heat' stored in the subtropical North Atlantic is in the deep ocean, below 2,300ft, new research suggests. 

Extreme storms could help PROTECT beaches from sea level rise 

Extreme storms could help protect beaches from sea level rise by bringing in new sand from deeper waters, a new study claims.

Images in the wake of violent coastal storms often focus purely on the damage caused to beaches, dunes, property, and surrounding infrastructure. 

However, these extreme weather events could help offset erosion to beaches caused by rising sea levels, by pulling up vast quantities of sediment from the ocean floor and depositing it along retreating shorelines.

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'As our planet warms, it's vital to understand how the excess heat taken up by the ocean is redistributed in the ocean interior all the way from the surface to the bottom, and it is important to take into account the deep ocean to assess the growth of Earth's "energy imbalance",' said Dr Marie-José Messias, from the University of Exeter.

'As well as finding that the deep ocean is holding much of this excess

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