Friday 1 July 2022 11:30 AM 'Octopus boom' in British waters for first time in 70 years: Fishermen report ... trends now

Friday 1 July 2022 11:30 AM 'Octopus boom' in British waters for first time in 70 years: Fishermen report ... trends now
Friday 1 July 2022 11:30 AM 'Octopus boom' in British waters for first time in 70 years: Fishermen report ... trends now

Friday 1 July 2022 11:30 AM 'Octopus boom' in British waters for first time in 70 years: Fishermen report ... trends now

'Octopus boom' in British waters for the first time in 70 years: Divers and fishermen report bumper sightings along Cornish coastline Huge numbers of octopus have been seen along Cornwall's coastline this month Common Octopus rarely seen in Cornish waters - usually recorded twice a year Conservationists believe this could be evidence of an octopus population boom The last recorded south coast boom was in 1948 - more than 70 years ago

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Huge numbers of octopus have been seen along Cornwall's coastline this month, in what experts are describing as a 'bumper year' for the species. 

Divers and snorkellers have reported an increase in sightings of Common Octopus (Octopus vulgaris), particularly around Cornwall's Lizard peninsula.

One Mevagissey fisherman reported catching 150 octopuses in a single day, compared to his usual catch of one or two a year. 

Despite its name, this large species of octopus is rarely seen in UK waters and has been recorded in Cornwall just twice a year on average. 

Conservationists now believe this could be evidence of an octopus population boom – an event last recorded along England's south coast more than 70 years ago.

Despite its name, 'Common Octopus', this large species of octopus is rarely seen in UK waters and has been recorded in Cornwall just twice a year on average.

Despite its name, 'Common Octopus', this large species of octopus is rarely seen in UK waters and has been recorded in Cornwall just twice a year on average.

Octopuses and humans share 'jumping genes' 

New research reveals that the human and octopus brain both share the same 'jumping genes.'

Over 45% of the human genome is composed of sequences called transposons, which are these 'jumping genes' that can 'move' from one point in a genome to another by shuffling or duplicating.

The research by Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn of Naples shows that the same ‘jumping genes’ are active both in the human brain and in the brain of two species, Octopus vulgaris, the common octopus, and Octopus bimaculoides, the Californian octopus. 

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'I got really excited when I started receiving messages from our Seasearch divers – not only because sightings of these striking animals are few and far between but because they'd seen several of them on one dive,'

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