Thursday 18 August 2022 02:10 PM Scientists put a GoPro on US Navy dolphins and captured them eating sea snakes ... trends now

Thursday 18 August 2022 02:10 PM Scientists put a GoPro on US Navy dolphins and captured them eating sea snakes ... trends now
Thursday 18 August 2022 02:10 PM Scientists put a GoPro on US Navy dolphins and captured them eating sea snakes ... trends now

Thursday 18 August 2022 02:10 PM Scientists put a GoPro on US Navy dolphins and captured them eating sea snakes ... trends now

What a close-up! Scientists strapped a GoPro on US Navy dolphins that are trained to hunt mines and captured bizarre footage of them eating sea snakes and giving 'side eye' looks A team of researchers attached GoPro cameras to six bottlenose dolphins   The dolphins are trained by the U.S. Navy to hunt for undersea mines and defend against enemy swimmers, among other duties  Over a six-month period, the dolphins were see eating over 200 fish and sea snakes as they swam through a pool and in San Diego Bay At several moments, the dolphins appear to give 'side eye' looks but the sea creatures attract prey by rotating their eyes

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A team of researchers attached cameras to U.S. Navy dolphins and captured rarely-seen footage of the sea creatures chasing fish, devouring sea snakes and even giving 'side eye' looks.

GoPro cameras were attached with harnesses to six bottlenose dolphins over a six-month period to record audio and video - capturing them catching over 200 fishes and sea snakes as they roamed through a seawater pool and in San Diego Bay off the coast of California

The dolphins, which are trained to identify undersea mines, defend against enemy swimmers and protect a portion of the country's nuclear stockpile, are being studied because researchers want to learn more about their communication methods when they're hunting. 

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A team of researchers attached cameras to U.S. Navy dolphins and captured rarely-seen footage of the sea creatures chasing fish and devouring sea snakes

A team of researchers attached cameras to U.S. Navy dolphins and captured rarely-seen footage of the sea creatures chasing fish and devouring sea snakes

Although it may seem like the dolphins are giving 'side eye' looks, scientists say their eyes rotate in order to attract prey

Although it may seem like the dolphins are giving 'side eye' looks, scientists say their eyes rotate in order to attract prey 

'Squeals continued as the dolphin seized, manipulated and swallowed the prey,' the

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