Thursday 24 November 2022 03:50 PM 3D scanners could AXE 100ml liquid limits in airports by 2024 trends now

Thursday 24 November 2022 03:50 PM 3D scanners could AXE 100ml liquid limits in airports by 2024 trends now
Thursday 24 November 2022 03:50 PM 3D scanners could AXE 100ml liquid limits in airports by 2024 trends now

Thursday 24 November 2022 03:50 PM 3D scanners could AXE 100ml liquid limits in airports by 2024 trends now

Airport security is about to get a lot faster thanks to new 'cutting-edge' technology that scans your hand luggage. 

The tech, now being trialled at Heathrow, Gatwick and Birmingham airports, uses computed tomography (CT), already used by hospitals to see inside bodies.

At security, the hand luggage goes along a conveyor belt and passes through advanced machines that are fitted with CT scanners to look inside the bags.

The scanners produce clear 3D images on-screen that can be rotated 360-degrees and zoomed in on by airport staff.

Detection algorithms call attention to any dubious items that may warrant further inspection, such as liquid explosives. 

Set to be rolled out by 2024, the tech will mean passengers no longer have to take out liquids and electrical equipment such as laptops from hand luggage. 

Currently, travelers having to remove these items and place them on big plastic trays is the biggest cause of delays at airport security. 

Rules on how much liquid can be taken aboard planes will also be abolished to coincide with the completed rollout, according to The Times

Airport security is about to get a lot faster thanks to new 'cutting-edge' technology that scans your hand luggage in a more detailed 3D image, rather than the traditional X-ray scanners and 2D images

Airport security is about to get a lot faster thanks to new 'cutting-edge' technology that scans your hand luggage in a more detailed 3D image, rather than the traditional X-ray scanners and 2D images

The tech, now being trialled at Heathrow, Gatwick and Birmingham airports, is based on computed tomography (CT) that's already used by hospitals to see inside bodies

The tech, now being trialled at Heathrow, Gatwick and Birmingham airports, is based on computed tomography (CT) that's already used by hospitals to see inside bodies

HOW DO THE SCANNERS WORK? 

The technology is based computed tomography (CT) — an imaging procedure already used by hospitals to see inside bodies. 

At security, hand luggage goes along a conveyor belt and passes through advanced machines that are fitted with CT scanners to look inside the bags.

The scanners produce clear 3D images on-screen that can be rotated 360-degrees and zoomed in on by airport staff.

Algorithms call attention to any dubious items that may warrant further inspection.  

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The new equipment scans passengers' baggage in 3D, which provides a much more detailed image to security officials compared to the traditional X-ray scanners and resulting 2D images.

Heathrow wouldn't reveal to MailOnline which firms are supplying the machines, although a firm called Analogic has already fitted them out in airports in the US. 

According to The Times, the Department for Transport (DfT) has told the UK's major airports that older screening technology must be replaced by the new CT system by summer 2024. 

The UK government previously said the technology would be implemented across the country by the end of 2022, but these plans were delayed by the Covid pandemic. 

An official announcement from the government about the rollout is now expected before Christmas. 

John Holland-Kaye, chief executive of Heathrow, told The Times that the machines are slowly being rolled out across the airport. 

'We have just started the expansion of the security area in Terminal 3 which will have more CT scanners and have a deadline of mid-2024 from the DfT,' he said. 

'By then the normal passenger experience will be that liquids stay in bags.' 

Currently, liquids in hand luggage must be inside 100ml containers that have to fit inside a single, transparent, resealable plastic bag measuring approximately 8 inches by 8 inches. 

Currently, travelers having to remove plastic liquid bags and laptops from their hand luggage and place them on big plastic trays is the biggest cause of delays at airport security

Currently, travelers having to remove plastic liquid bags and laptops from their hand luggage and place them on big plastic trays is the biggest cause of delays at airport security

Heathrow wouldn't reveal to MailOnline which firms are supplying the machines, although a firm called Analogic has already fitted it out to airports in the US

Heathrow wouldn't reveal to MailOnline which firms are supplying the machines, although a firm called Analogic has already fitted it out to airports in the US 

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