Urgent warning to drivers over fake parking apps being advertised on Google ... trends now

Urgent warning to drivers over fake parking apps being advertised on Google ... trends now
Urgent warning to drivers over fake parking apps being advertised on Google ... trends now

Urgent warning to drivers over fake parking apps being advertised on Google ... trends now

Parking tickets aren't the only way drivers can lose hundreds of pounds while leaving their cars in town.

Motorists have been urged to be wary of fake parking apps being advertised on Google, which trick you into paying for unwanted subscriptions.

Which? warns that these scam ads often appear at the top of search results - and can even come above the legitimate sites. 

Based on the findings, Which? is encouraging drivers to avoid looking for apps on search engines, and instead use the official app stores.

Lisa Web, Which? consumer law expert, told MailOnline: 'Fraudsters infiltrating Google and other search engines to dupe consumers into paying for fake parking is really worrying and could end up costing victims hundreds of pounds.'

Drivers have been warned to avoid adverts for fake parking payment apps which can charge hundreds of pounds for unwanted subscriptions (stock image)

Drivers have been warned to avoid adverts for fake parking payment apps which can charge hundreds of pounds for unwanted subscriptions (stock image)

How to avoid being scammed by fake parking app adverts 
Don't search for parking payment options on your search engine. Only download apps from the official app store. Do not give your card details to apps you don't trust. Always read the URL of websites carefully before clicking. Check the fine print carefully for additional conditions or costs. 

Advertisement

Which? found that Google search results frequently displayed adverts for fake parking payment apps at the top of the search results.

Scammers create adverts impersonating popular parking payment apps such as PayByPhone, JustPark, and RingGo.

Which? discovered two separate sites - onlytelephone.com and homeautomationinnovators.com - posing as PayByPhone in Google adverts.

Google even placed these fraudulent ads above legitimate results for the real PayByPhone website.

Both offered a 'free download' but hid fine print at the bottom of the website which commits unwary users to paying a monthly subscription.

By taking the free download, drivers could be stuck with a £24.99 ($31.40) monthly payment to an unnamed company for a 'health and lifestyle bundle subscription'. 

These sites have nothing to do with the real PayByPhone and do not have permission to use

read more from dailymail.....

PREV Terrifying maps reveal the three areas of the globe that will experience ... trends now
NEXT Elon Musk takes Tesla's creepy Optimus robot for a walk around the factory - as ... trends now