See Iceland's volcanic eruption from SPACE: Dramatic photo snapped by a ... trends now

See Iceland's volcanic eruption from SPACE: Dramatic photo snapped by a ... trends now
See Iceland's volcanic eruption from SPACE: Dramatic photo snapped by a ... trends now

See Iceland's volcanic eruption from SPACE: Dramatic photo snapped by a ... trends now

Residents of Iceland's Reykjanes peninsula faced yet more destruction last week as they faced the third volcanic eruption since December. 

Now, a satellite image reveals the true scale of the latest eruption.  

The image was snapped by the European Union's Copernicus' SENTINEL-2 satellite just 10 hours after the eruption on February 8.

It shows how lava rapidly bled into the frozen landscape, travelling up to 2.8 miles (4.5 km) west, and destroying pipes that provide 20,000 people with hot water.

It also highlights just how close the lava came to hitting the vital Svartsengi power plant.

Satellite imagery from the EU's Copernicus Sentinel 2 satellite captures the shocking power of the latest eruption on Iceland's Reykjanes peninsula

Satellite imagery from the EU's Copernicus Sentinel 2 satellite captures the shocking power of the latest eruption on Iceland's Reykjanes peninsula 

This is the third eruption to hit the Reykjanes peninsula (highlighted red) in the last three months, leading the town of Grindavik to be evacuated

This is the third eruption to hit the Reykjanes peninsula (highlighted red) in the last three months, leading the town of Grindavik to be evacuated 

Shortly after 5:30am local time, a two-mile fissure tore open and sent lava spewing out into the frozen landscape

Shortly after 5:30am local time, a two-mile fissure tore open and sent lava spewing out into the frozen landscape 

At around 5:30am local time on February 8, an eruption ripped open a 1.9-mile (3km) fissure in the Earth just 2.5 miles (4km) north of Grindavik.

At the time of the eruption, Iceland's Meteorological Office (IMO) estimated that nine million cubic meters of magma had built up in a volcanic chamber.

When the pressure eventually became too great and the volcano burst open, this lava spewed out into the surrounding area. 

In the striking satellite image, you can see the vast area covered by still-glowing lava flows.  

Previous eruptions in the Reykjanes peninsula have sent lava flows travelling southwards, coming dangerously close to Grindavik and the nearby power station. 

In January, lava from the most dangerous eruption travelled to the edge of town and destroyed at least three houses.  

However, as this image reveals, lava from the February 8 eruption mainly travelled to the west.

The Copernicus satellite image shows that the lava flow travelled 2.8 miles (4.5 km) from the eruption site, settling into a long thin flow.

Lava flows from the eruption travelled 2.8 miles (4.5 km) west, hitting a key hot water pipe (pictured) near the Blue Lagoon tourist attraction

Lava flows from the eruption travelled 2.8 miles (4.5 km) west, hitting a key hot water pipe (pictured) near the Blue Lagoon tourist attraction

The eruption sent out an enormous plume of steam and gas which can also be seen in the satellite imagery. Iceland's Met Office, however, now says that the risk of gas pollution has abated in the town of Grindavik

The eruption sent out an enormous plume of steam and gas which can also be seen in the satellite imagery. Iceland's Met Office, however, now says that the risk of gas pollution has abated in the town of Grindavik 

In the satellite image, you can also see the plume of gas being shot out by the eruption. 

The Copernicus team said in a statement: 'The smoke plume and the lava flow can clearly be seen near the city of Grindavik.' 

While the white plume seen in the image is mainly composed of

read more from dailymail.....

PREV FBI warns AI 'sextortion' has risen by more than 1,000% in the US - and a ... trends now
NEXT Roman chicken egg discovered in Aylesbury still has its liquid yolk and whites ... trends now