Ask the tech expert: My friend's aunt claims she's good with crypto and is ... trends now

Ask the tech expert: My friend's aunt claims she's good with crypto and is ... trends now
Ask the tech expert: My friend's aunt claims she's good with crypto and is ... trends now

Ask the tech expert: My friend's aunt claims she's good with crypto and is ... trends now

Dear Kim,

A new Facebook friend says she has an aunt who is really good with crypto. 

After a little struggle with names, I verified they are real people. 

The aunt showed me three trades where I made 15 percent with a $500 investment in 10 minutes while I watched on WhatsApp. 

I have lost no money at this point. 

I wanted to know your thoughts before I give the aunt $10,000. 

— Jim from Sacramento, California

Dear Kim, A new Facebook friend says she has an aunt who is really good with crypto. I wanted to know your thoughts before I give the aunt $10,000

Dear Kim, A new Facebook friend says she has an aunt who is really good with crypto. I wanted to know your thoughts before I give the aunt $10,000

Dear Jim 

I'm sorry to be the bearer of bad news, Jim. This is a classic pig butchering scam. 

I know it all feels like things just fell into place — and that's the point.

How am I so sure? What's happening here is following the exact script these criminals use. I'll outline it for you.

Cold outreach: It starts with a random text, friend request, DM or comment. 

Sometimes, the person claims it's the wrong number — or they just liked your profile picture. They're friendly and chatty. 

I don't know about you, but I wouldn't keep talking if I hit the wrong number.

Feeding time: Your new friend slowly builds up your trust. 

They want to know about your life, maybe send you photos and tell you about what they're in. 

Radio show host Kim Komando offers advice to help people navigate the world of technology

Radio show host Kim Komando offers advice to help people navigate the world of technology

After a while, money comes up. It's usually under the guise of an investment opportunity. 

They did so well in crypto that they want to share it with you, too.

Fattening the pig: This is where money changes hands — but only a small amount. 

They'll ask you to test with a small investment. Surprise, your money is growing already! 

The person might send you a video, photos or even an account to log in to where you can see how well your investment is going. 

Slowly but surely, they'll convince you to add more and more to the account.

Slaughter: Now you're convinced and have invested even more. At this stage, victims can be in for tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars. 

Higher net-worth targets might have millions sitting with the scammer. 

You may realize something is wrong in this phase and ask to remove

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