Lyrid Meteor Shower peaks tonight with up to 18 shooting stars overhead every ... trends now

Lyrid Meteor Shower peaks tonight with up to 18 shooting stars overhead every ... trends now
Lyrid Meteor Shower peaks tonight with up to 18 shooting stars overhead every ... trends now

Lyrid Meteor Shower peaks tonight with up to 18 shooting stars overhead every ... trends now

The Lyrid Meteor Shower is active through most of April, but peaks tonight Eagle-eyed stargazers will be able to spot up to 18 shooting stars every hour

View
comments

It's something that features on many people's bucket lists. 

And now you might finally get the chance to see a shooting star, with a stunning meteor shower set to peak this evening.  

The Lyrid Meteor Shower is active through most of April, but will officially reach its peak tonight. 

Eagle-eyed stargazers will be able to spot up to 18 shooting stars overhead every hour - and experts say you don't even need a telescope!

Here's everything you need to know about the Lyrid Meteor Shower, including how and when to see it from the UK. 

It's something that features on many people's bucket lists. And now you might finally get the chance to see a shooting star, with a stunning meteor shower set to peak this evening

It's something that features on many people's bucket lists. And now you might finally get the chance to see a shooting star, with a stunning meteor shower set to peak this evening 

Meteor showers in 2024 

Lyrids: 22-23 April 

Eta Aquariids: 6 May 

Alpha Capricornids: 30 July

Delta Aquariids: 30 July

Perseids: 12-13 August

Draconids: 8-9 October

Orionids: 21-22 October

Taurids: 12-13 November

Leonids: 18 November

Geminids: 14-15 December

Ursids: 23 December 

Advertisement

What is the Lyrid Meteor Shower? 

The Lyrid Meteor Shower occurs around mid to late April, when the Earth passes through debris from the Comet C/1861 G1 Thatcher. 

'These objects are moving extremely fast (about 50km/s) compared to the relatively still atmosphere,' the Royal Museums Greenwich explained. 

'In fact, they fall so fast that the air in front of them can’t get out of the way fast enough, instead getting rapidly squashed and heating up. 

'This causes the surface of the meteor to reach temperatures as high 1600°C, glowing brightly, which is visible as a short-lived streak of light in the sky.'

The Lyrids will be visible all across the sky, although they appear to originate from the constellation of Lyra, which is where they get their name. 

When is the Lyrid Meteor Shower?

This year, the Lyrid Meteor Shower has been running since 14

read more from dailymail.....

NEXT Move over, Gnasher! The Beano will feature a guide dog for first time to raise ... trends now