Mysterious Russian radio signal that's been transmitting for 40 years baffles ... trends now

Mysterious Russian radio signal that's been transmitting for 40 years baffles ... trends now

For four decades, since the height of the Cold War, a mysterious radio signal has been broadcast out of Russia — baffling ham radio fans, scientists and spies alike.

Some speculate it's part of the Russian government's own secret SETI program or even actively communicating with a visiting alien species. 

Others believe it might be a 'Dead Hand' doomsday trigger, ready to launch nuclear weapons if Russia's leadership is knocked out of commission. 

But according to a professor of electronics and radio engineering, who has studied the signal, one thing is certain: 'It is almost certainly the Russian government that is using it,' he said.

And: 'If it is the Russian government, it wouldn't be for peaceful purposes.'

For four decades, since the height of the Cold War, a mysterious radio signal has been broadcast out of Russia (example above) - baffling ham radio fans, scientists and spies alike

Some speculate that it's part of the Russian government's own secret SETI program, communicating with alien life. Above, one of the towers that broadcast the signal from 19 miles outside of Moscow

For four decades, since the height of the Cold War, a mysterious radio signal has been broadcast out of Russia - example signal at left - baffling ham radio fans, scientists and spies alike. Above, right, one of the towers that broadcast the signal, 19 miles outside of Moscow

Professor David Stupples, who teaches electronic and radio engineering at the City University of London, personally believes that the enigmatic broadcast, nicknamed 'The Buzzer,' has likely been kept active as a fail-safe in case of nuclear war.

Broadcast at the 4625kHz shortwave radio frequency, the Buzzer has led some physicists to speculate that its signal is being used to monitor Earth's ionosphere.

But Professor Stupples — whose expertise is in orbital or otherwise space-based reconnaissance platforms, surveillance, and navigation systems — acknowledges that both incredible and mundane explanations are all still on the table.

'They may be just reserving the channel for air defense or some form of defense,' Stupples told Popular Mechanics this week.

'If they don't actually use it, someone will poach it,' according to Stupples. 'They are keeping the channel available by broadcasting and saying, "this is ours."'

" class="c7" scrolling="no"

In 2010, the source point of the UVB-76 broadcast shifted, surrounded by odd events and new quirks to its seemingly random tones, voices and information - which it has broadcast continuously since the 1970s

In 2010, the source point of the UVB-76 broadcast shifted, surrounded by odd events and new quirks to its seemingly random tones, voices and information - which it has broadcast continuously since the 1970s

Amateur ham radio interest and unclassified scientific interest in 'The Buzzer,' officially known by its original call sign 'UVB-76,' first spiked in 1982.

Back then, the station was known to broadcast only a coded and baffling series of beeps, but by 1992 the broadcasts got stranger: a series of buzzing noises, 25 times every minute, for less than a second each, and occasionally an ominous foghorn.

During the nineties, UVB-76's buzzing would also become sporadically interrupted by anonymous male and female voices, who would read lists of seemingly random names, words, or numbers. 

The tones of the noises the station broadcast would vary as well, potentially with secret information packed inside those tonal shifts.

This diversity of odd broadcasts is what caught Professor Stupples's and other researchers' attention, because that variety is out of character for a simple 'emergency placeholder' signal.

According to the surveillance engineering expert, a government or military institution that simply wants to keep control of a certain radio frequency will typically just broadcast a single basic test pattern, over and over again.

Not only does the UVB-76 'Buzzer' broadcast more complex and confusing signals instead — it does so powerfully, with over many thousands of watts of energy transferred, based on Professor Stupples's measurements, and in all directions.

'I have put it through my signal spectrum analyzers,' Stupples said, 'and I can't pick any intelligence out at all.'

A Russian student based in Canada, Egor Esveev, tracked down the mystery broadcast to a seemingly abandoned Russian base near Pskov, on the border with Estonia. Esveev told MailOnline.com in 2014 that he found the abandoned location very eerie

A Russian student based in Canada, Egor Esveev, tracked down the mystery broadcast to a seemingly abandoned Russian base near Pskov, on the border with Estonia. Esveev told MailOnline.com in 2014 that he found the abandoned

read more from dailymail.....

NEXT Craziest skyscrapers in development across the US - from the Big Bend to 'poop ... trends now