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Facial recognition cameras could be used by police

Police could one day use body cameras fitted with real-time facial recognition to help them catch criminals and find missing people. 

Motorola has partnered with artificial intelligence startup Neurala to create smart cameras capable of independently searching for criminals and missing children.

The companies are still developing a prototype, but hope the AI-driven cameras could soon help police find targets in 'suspicious' or 'chaotic' environments.

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Police could one day use body cameras fitted with real-time facial recognition. Pictured is a demo of the technology being used to locate a missing child on a busy street

Police could one day use body cameras fitted with real-time facial recognition. Pictured is a demo of the technology being used to locate a missing child on a busy street

HOW DO THE SMART CAMERAS WORK? 

Neurala has created patent-pending facial recognition software capable of working on very small computers, allowing it to be used on wearable devices. 

The cameras will use artificial intelligence to automatically scan hundreds of faces in a crowd, notifying authorities when they come across a known target. 

Neurala's founder, Massimiliano Versace, said the software works in a similar way to the mammalian brain, allowing it learn faster than traditional search technology.

The technology is composed of a group of specialised processors which form different parts of a 'mini brain'.

And the new technology is capable of machine learning, meaning the more faces that it encounters, the faster it comes at detection. 

'We see powerful potential for artificial intelligence to improve safety and efficiency for our customers, which in turn helps create safer communities,' said Paul Steinberg, chief technology officer at Motorola.

'But applying AI in a public safety setting presents unique challenges.

'Neurala's 'edge learning' capabilities will help us explore solutions for a variety of public safety workflows such as finding a missing child or investigating an object of interest, such as a bicycle.'

Neurala has created patent-pending facial recognition software capable of working on very small computers, allowing it to be incorporated into wearable devices.

Motorola said today that the software will be combined with its devices, including its Si500

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