Amazon pulls Blu phones over China security issue

Ultra-cheap Chinese-made Android phones which sell for as little as $60 have been banned from Amazon after they were found to be sending data about users to a Chinese server.

The handsets, branded Blu, were pulled by Amazon due to a 'potential security issue.'

Last week, security firm Kryptowire discovered the software that comes pre-installed on the devices has been automatically sending user data to China without alerting users.

Scroll down for video

Only last Novemeber, this exact same concern was an issue when it was found that the same Chinese manufacturer had installed a 'backdoor' on at least 700 million phones, including 120,000 Blu phones

Adups, the manufacturer, was using the command and control, which is an especially dangerous type of breach in that it allows the the unauthorized party to execute commands like its the user

Only last Novemeber, this exact same concern was an issue when it was found that the same Chinese manufacturer had installed a 'backdoor' on at least 700 million phones, including 120,000 Blu phones

THE SNEAKY SOFTWARE 

The feature was discovered by Virginia-based security firm Kryptowire.

The software forces the affected phones to send all the device's text messages to a server in China every 72 hours, the analysts said.

The core of the monitoring activities took place using a commercial Firmware Over The Air (FOTA) update software system that was shipped with the affected Android devices.

The devices actively transmitted user and device information including 'the full-body of text messages, contact lists, call history with full telephone numbers' and identifiers, Kryptowire said. 

'Because security and privacy of our customers is of the utmost importance, all Blu phone models have been made unavailable for purchase on Amazon.com until the issue is resolved,' Amazon said in a statement.

Blu denied any wrongdoing and defended the software, which was created by a Chinese company called Shanghai Adups Technology.

A spokesperson told CNET it isn't spyware and the company 'has several policies in place which take customer privacy and security seriously.' 

Yet only last November, this exact same concern was an issue when it was found that the same Chinese manufacturer had installed a 'backdoor' on at least 700 million phones, including 120,000 Blu phones.

The software was monitoring where users went and who they called and texted, then forcing the phones to

read more from dailymail.....

Get the latest news delivered to your inbox

Follow us on social media networks

NEXT Technology Cramer unpacks Analog Devices' 'mosaic' of unstoppable growth drivers