Scientists suggest that aliens will 'look like us'

They're regularly depicted in science fiction blockbusters as other-worldly, monster-like beings.

But a new study suggests that in reality, aliens could be more similar to us than thought.

The research indicates that aliens are potentially shaped by the same processes that shaped humans, such as natural selection, and that they may even 'look like us.'

Scroll down for video 

They're regularly depicted in science fiction blockbusters as other-worldly, monster-like beings. But a new study suggests that in reality, aliens could be more similar to us than thought

They're regularly depicted in science fiction blockbusters as other-worldly, monster-like beings. But a new study suggests that in reality, aliens could be more similar to us than thought

THE EVOLUTION OF ALIENS 

Researchers have shown for the first time how evolutionary theory can be used to predict alien behaviour.

Their theory supports the argument that foreign life forms undergo natural selection, and like us, are evolving to be stronger over time.

Using the idea of alien natural selection as a framework, the researchers addressed extra-terrestrial evolution, and how complexity will arise in space.

On Earth, species have become more complex as a result of a handful of events.

These transitions occur when a group of separate organisms evolve into a higher-level organism - when cells become multi-cellular organisms, for example.

Data suggests that extreme conditions are required for major transitions to occur.

Researchers from the University of Oxford have shown for the first time how evolutionary theory can be used to predict alien behaviour.

Their theory supports the argument that foreign life forms undergo natural selection, and like us, are evolving to be stronger over time.

Mr Sam Levin, lead author of the study, said: 'A fundamental task for astrobiologists (those who study life in the cosmos) is thinking about what extra-terrestrial life might be like.

'But making predictions about aliens is hard.

'We only have one example of life - life on Earth - to extrapolate from.

'Past approaches in the field of astrobiology have been largely mechanistic, taking what we see on Earth, and what we know about chemistry, geology, and physics to make predictions about aliens.

'In our paper, we offer an alternative approach, which is to use evolutionary theory to make predictions that are independent of Earth's details.

'This is a useful approach, because theoretical predictions will apply to aliens that are silicon based, do not have DNA, and breathe nitrogen, for example.'

Using the idea of alien natural selection as a framework, the researchers addressed extra-terrestrial evolution, and how complexity will arise in space.

On Earth, species have become more complex as a result of a handful of events.

Pictured is a fictitious alien called 'The Octomite' that comprises a hierarchy of entities (pictured is circles, right)

Pictured is a fictitious alien

read more from dailymail.....

Get the latest news delivered to your inbox

Follow us on social media networks

NEXT Scientists suggest that aliens will 'look like us'