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'Booms' in Arizona may be caused by military training

This week, residents across southern Arizona have been left baffled by a series of mysterious 'booms' heard across the region.

Suspected causes ranged from meteors exploding in the atmosphere to the arrival of aliens.

But a nearby Air Force Base claims the booms may have been the result of training exercises it ran this week.

The Arizona booms are not an isolated event, and the mysterious sounds have been heard around the world this year, in locations including Michigan, Lapland, St Ives, Swansea and Yorkshire.

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This week, residents across southern Arizona have been left baffled by a series of mysterious 'booms' heard across the region. But the mystery may have finally been solved, as a nearby Air Force Base claims the booms may have been the result of training exercises it ran this week

This week, residents across southern Arizona have been left baffled by a series of mysterious 'booms' heard across the region. But the mystery may have finally been solved, as a nearby Air Force Base claims the booms may have been the result of training exercises it ran this week

ARE THE BOOMS CAUSED BY PLANES? 

Luke Air Force Base in Phoenix claims it may be responsible for the mysterious noises.

The base said it is hosting a training exercise with Singapore, with an influx of planes in the area.

The exercises started on November 27, and will run through to December 11.

A statement said: 'The areas around Luke and the BMGR may experience more noise than usual as a result of the increased air activity and types of aircraft involved.

'Aircrafts involved will include F-16 Fighting Falcon, F-15E Strike Eagle and Heron 1UAS.

'There will be an increased military presence with military movements along Highway 85 south of Gila Bend as military position themselves within the Barry M. Goldwater range.'

The booms were heard alongside rumbles across southern Arizona, ranging from Oro Valley to Picture Rocks, and Douglas to Nogales.

Several people reported hearing noises at around 20:00 on November 28, and at 15:00 on November 29.

And the bizarre activity was even strong enough to be picked up by the seismic monitoring station at the University of Arizona Geosciences Department.

Now, Luke Air Force Base in Phoenix claims it may be responsible for the mysterious noises - although it still has no direct evidence. 

The base said it is hosting a training exercise with Singapore, with an influx of planes in the area.

The exercises started on November 27, and will run through to December 11.

A statement said: 'The areas around Luke and the BMGR may experience more noise than usual as a result of the increased air activity and types of aircraft involved.

'Aircrafts involved will include F-16 Fighting Falcon, F-15E Strike Eagle and Heron 1UAS.

The bizarre activity was even strong enough to be picked up by the seismic monitoring station at the University of Arizona Geosciences Department

The bizarre activity was even strong enough to be picked up by the seismic monitoring station at the University of Arizona Geosciences Department

'There will be an increased military presence with military movements along Highway 85 south of Gila Bend as military position themselves within the Barry M. Goldwater range.'

The Arizona booms are not an isolated event, and the mysterious sounds have been heard around the world this year.

This year alone, similar noises have been reported 64 times this year, in locations including Michigan, Lapland, St Ives, Swansea and Yorkshire. 

And while the booms in Arizona may have an explanation, many others haven't.

Mysterious booms have been reported 64 times this year, in locations including Michigan, Lapland, St Ives, Swansea and Yorkshire. Incidents are becoming more frequent according to some reports.

Mysterious booms have been reported 64 times this year, in locations including Michigan, Lapland, St Ives, Swansea and Yorkshire. Incidents are becoming more frequent according to some reports.

WHAT COULD THEY BE? 

In 2017 alone, 64 booms have been heard worldwide. 

The cause of most of the booms remains a mystery, although several explanations have been suggested.  

1) Sonic booms 

A sonic boom is the sound associated with the shock waves created by an object traveling through the air faster than the speed of sound – such as supersonic aircrafts.

Sonic booms generate significant amounts of sound energy, sounding like an explosion to the human ear. 

2) Military exercises

Many unexplained loud noises can be put down to military training, either at Army or Naval bases or in remote areas used for such exercises.

3) Controlled explosions  

A controlled explosion is a method for detonating or disabling a suspected explosive device, such as bags left at train stations.

4) Unusual weather

Many loud noises link back to unusual weather events, such as electrical storms or thunder storms.  

5) Meteors

Large meteors passing above Earth often produce shock waves that can be heard as a sonic boom. 

6) Sound amplified from aircraft

Some have suggested that the sound was due to inversion - a phenomenon that occurs when a layer of warm air sits over a layer of cooler air, magnifying the sound of an aircraft miles away.   

7) Aliens 

Some conspiracy theorists claim that the mysterious booms are noises created by aliens - although there is no evidence to support this. 

Alabama, November 14 

Cause: Unknown, suggested explanations include a sonic boom from an aircraft or a meteorite 

The Birmingham National Weather Service tweeted: 'Loud boom heard: we do not see anything indicating large fire/smoke on radar or satellite; nothing on USGS indicating an earthquake.'

The service suggested that the sound was either caused by a sonic boom from aircraft, or a meteorite from the Leonid shower.

But Nasa has since cast doubt on these explanations.

Speaking to ABC 3340, Bill Cooke, head of Nasa's Meteoroid Environment Office, said that the boom could have been caused by a supersonic aircraft, a ground explosion, or a bolide - a large meteor that explodes in the atmosphere unrelated to the Leonid shower.

While the noise was picked up by the US Geological Survey, data suggests that the boom wasn't the result of an earthquake.

The boom may have been caused by a military flight by a supersonic jet, although the US Air Force is yet to confirm this.

The Bama Boom is just one of many mysterious booms heard worldwide this year.

Idaho, November 15 

Cause: Unknown 

The day after the boom in Alabama, a similar noise was heard in Idaho.

Multiple people reported hearing a loud boom over the Lewiston-Clarkston Valley around 23:00.

Many of the reports described the

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