Artefacts found in ancient waste dump in Newcastle

Medieval artefacts trapped in a waterlogged waste dump for 900 years have been found in Newcastle.

Archaeologists have uncovered green-glazed pottery, neatly cut animal horns, as well as a pit-like oven during excavations of a construction site.

A woven wooden fence and the boundaries of a home running parallel to the modern street were also discovered.

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Medieval artefacts preserved in a waterlogged waste dump for 900 years have been found in Newcastle. Archaeologists have uncovered green-glazed pottery, neatly cut animal horns, as well as a pit-like oven (pictured) during excavations of a construction site

Medieval artefacts preserved in a waterlogged waste dump for 900 years have been found in Newcastle. Archaeologists have uncovered green-glazed pottery, neatly cut animal horns, as well as a pit-like oven (pictured) during excavations of a construction site

WHAT THEY FOUND 

It is thought the objects, which have been preserved in a medieval rubbish dump known as a 'midden', date back as far as the 12th century.

They were so well preserved because the dump had been waterlogged.

The midden was around a a metre [3.2 ft] deep and filled with organic material and filth, including neatly cut animal horns and leather.

About 1.5 metres (5 ft) into the ground, remains of a wattle fence were found running parallel to the existing street.

A pit that was likely used as an oven was also found inside the boundaries of a building.

It is thought the objects, many of which have been preserved in a medieval rubbish dump known as a 'midden', date back to the 12th century. 

Archaeologist Dr Richard Carlton from Tyneside firm The Archaeological Practice explained that the materials were so well preserved because the dump had been waterlogged.

He said: 'There was about a metre [3.2 ft] depth of midden with organic material and filth, and you can imagine what sort of stuff you find.

'Within that was all sorts of interesting stuff like organic remains which reveal how people were living and what they were doing.

'Particularly interesting finds here were several examples of animal horn neatly cut, presumably for reuse as handles or another function.'

The site was described by Dr Carlton as 'one of the richest sites ever investigated in medieval

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