Rising seas will swallow 14,000 U.S. historic sites

Almost 14,000 archaeological sites and national monuments in the United States could be lost by the year 2100 as seas rise due to climate change, scientists have revealed.

The findings offer a glimpse into the vast amount of global cultural heritage that could be destroyed, the study said.

One in 10 archaeological sites that it analysed on nine southeastern coastal states risk inundation.

Almost 14,000 archaeological sites and national monuments in the United States could be lost by the year 2100 as seas rise due to climate change, scientists have revealed. This will affect much of the Gulf and Atlantic coasts in the southeastern US, the researchers warned

Almost 14,000 archaeological sites and national monuments in the United States could be lost by the year 2100 as seas rise due to climate change, scientists have revealed. This will affect much of the Gulf and Atlantic coasts in the southeastern US, the researchers warned

THE AFFECTED AREAS 

New research has warned that almost 14,000 archaeological sites and national monuments in the United States could be lost by the year 2100 as seas rise due to climate change.

The phenomenon will affect much of the Gulf and Atlantic coasts in the southeastern US, the researchers warned in the new study.

Florida's 17th century Castillo de San Marcos fortress and Fort Matanzas, which date back to European colonial struggles for the New World, are among the historic national monuments that could disappear.

Other sites are in Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana.

Among the affected sites could be Jamestown, Virginia – the site of the first permanent English settlement in North America.

‘Sea-level rise in the coming years will destroy vast numbers of archaeological sites, buildings, cemeteries, and cultural landscapes,’ said co-author David Anderson, from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

‘Developing informatics capabilities at regional and continental scales like DINAA (Digital index of North American Archaeology) is essential if we are to effectively plan for, and help mitigate, this loss of human history.’

Recent studies have found that sea levels could rise by 1 meter in the next century, and 5 or more meters in the centuries to follow.

This will affect much of the Gulf and Atlantic coasts in the southeastern US, the researchers warned in the new study.

Among the affected sites could be Jamestown, Virginia – the site of the first permanent English settlement in North America.

Along with the direct implications

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