Mind-reading Nissan car could be available in five years

Cars which speed up drivers' reaction times and anticipate acceleration, steering and braking by reading brainwaves could be available within five to ten years.

The breakthrough was pioneered by Japanese firm Nissan, whose Brain-to-Vehicle technology lets a car interpret signals from a driver's brain.

This information can be used to make manual driving more efficient, as well as to customise automated vehicles to mirror their owner's style of driving.

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Cars which speed up drivers' reaction times and anticipate acceleration, steering and braking by reading brainwaves could be available within five to ten years. The breakthrough Brain-to-Vehicle technology behind the development was pioneered by Japanese firm Nissan

Cars which speed up drivers' reaction times and anticipate acceleration, steering and braking by reading brainwaves could be available within five to ten years. The breakthrough Brain-to-Vehicle technology behind the development was pioneered by Japanese firm Nissan

HOW DOES IT WORK? 

During trials, a driver wore a device that measures brain wave activity, which was then analysed by an autonomous system.

By anticipating intended movement, the system can take action, including turning the steering wheel or slowing the car, 0.2 to 0.5 seconds faster than the driver, while remaining largely imperceptible.

By detecting and evaluating driver discomfort, artificial intelligence can change the driving configuration or driving style when in autonomous mode.

Nissan's goal is to offer the optimum level of driving assistance in manual driving mode so that a driver can be in complete control of his or her car.

And, by measuring brainwaves in real time, the firm can also customise a vehicle's autonomous driving system to best match the owner's driving style.

They hope to implement the technology into their vehicles in between five to 10 years.

Nissan will unveil its Brain-to-Vehicle (B2V) system at the CES 2018 trade show, being held next week in Las Vegas.

The development is the result of Nissan's research into the use of brain decoding technology, which can predict a driver's actions and detect discomfort.

By catching signs that the driver's brain is about to initiate a movement, such as turning the steering wheel or pushing the accelerator pedal, driver assist technology begins the action more quickly.

This can improve reaction times and enhance manual driving, as well as to refine autonomous vehicles.

Executive vice president Daniele Schillaci said: 'When most people think about autonomous driving, they have a very impersonal vision of the future, where humans relinquish control to the machines.

'Yet B2V technology does the opposite, by using signals from their own brain to make the drive even more exciting and enjoyable.

'Through Nissan Intelligent Mobility, we are moving people to a better world by delivering more autonomy, more electrification and more connectivity.' 

During trials, a driver wore a device that measures brain wave activity, which was then

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