Why does this spinning arrow optical illusion ALWAYS point right?

A spinning arrow that always points right has been created as part of an incredible optical illusion taking the internet by storm.

The trick of the eye - which is the latest in a long line designed by a Japanese mathematician - appears at first glance to be a simple white arrow

Looks can be deceiving, however, as the object - mounted on a wooden stand - has been carefully crafted to achieve its mind-bending effect.

This duplicity can only be seen when viewing the device from above, revealing its secret.

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The illusion is the brainchild of Professor Kokichi Sugihara, doctor of engineering at Meiji University in Tokyo.

Professor Sugihara is famous for building 3D optical illusions that cause viewers to question the laws of physics and even after the hoax is revealed they can still see the same visual trick taking place.

The illusion is featured in video footage posted to the Instagram page Physicsfun, where it had been viewed 368,452 times at the time of publication.

In the description, its author writes: 'Spin this arrow 180 degrees and it still points to the right - only in a mirror will it point left, and only to the left.

'A clever combination of reflection, perspective, and viewing angle produce this striking illusion.' 

This mirror image provides a clue to the design of the spinning arrow, which is responsible for it's seemingly magical properties.

A spinning arrow that always points right has been created as part of an incredible optical illusion taking the internet by storm. The trick of the eye appears at first glance to be a simple white arrow, mounted on a wooden stand

A spinning arrow that always points right has been created as part of an incredible optical illusion taking the internet by storm. The trick of the eye appears at first glance to be a simple white arrow, mounted on a wooden stand

In the latter part of the clip, the arrow is tilted up to reveal its true shape - an oblong with two pointed ends, with multiple upward and downward gradients.

It is this strange symmetrical layout, a characteristic feature of Professor Sugihara's work, that achieves the illusion.

When viewed from above, the arrow object is perfectly symmetrical, but from the perspective it is first viewed from in the video, the alternating undulations visible from above make it appear as if it points in one direction.

Your brain then tries to match this shape to something familiar, filling in the gaps in your perception with the most obvious candidate - an arrow.

The illusion is the brainchild of Professor Kokichi Sugihara, doctor of engineering at Meiji University in Tokyo

Looks can be deceiving, as the object has been carefully crafted to achieve its mind-bending effect

The illusion is the brainchild of Professor Kokichi Sugihara, doctor of engineering at Meiji University in Tokyo. Looks can be deceiving, as the object has been carefully crafted to achieve its mind-bending effect

This duplicity can only be discerned when viewing the device from above. The object's true shape is an oblong with two pointed ends, with multiple upward and downward gradients. It is this strange symmetrical layout that achieves the illusion

This duplicity can only be discerned when viewing the device from above. The object's true shape is an oblong with two pointed ends, with multiple upward and downward gradients. It is this strange symmetrical layout that achieves the illusion

HOW DOES THE RIGHT SPINNING ARROW ILLUSION WORK?

A spinning arrow that always points right has been created as part of an incredible optical illusion taking the internet by storm.

The trick of the eye, which is the latest in a long line designed by a Japanese mathematician, appears at first glance to be a simple white arrow, mounted on a wooden stand.

Looks can be deceiving, however, as the object has been carefully crafted to achieve its mind-bending effect, and this duplicity can only be discerned when viewing the device from above. 

When viewed from above, the arrow object is perfectly symmetrical, but from the perspective it is first seen, the alternating undulations visible from above make it appear as if it points in one direction.

Your brain then tries to match this shape to something familiar, filling in the gaps in your perception with the most obvious candidate - an arrow. 

This is not the first time that the perception-altering illusions of Professor Sugihara have hit the headlines.

An illusion created using 'ambiguous cylinders' has been blowing the internet's collective mind since it was posted online in 2016. 

Professor Sugihara received second place at that year's annual Illusion of the Year contest for his offering. In it, a set of plastic squares appear to be circular when placed in front of a mirror.

A video of the illusion was posted on Reddit and quickly got the attention of readers who were left bemused by its mind-bending optics.

The minute long clip shows six plastic squares fused together that, when placed in front of a mirror, appear to be shaped like circles. Then, the squares are rotated and appear to be shaped like circles, while the

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