Stunning NASA image shows how massive 'ice block avalanches' reshape the ...

A NASA spacecraft revisiting Martian sites it first documented over a decade ago has captured the stunning transformation in one region caused by an avalanche of ice.

In December 2006, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter photographed layered deposits in Mars’ North Pole.

A new image of the same site shows a landscape that looks almost completely different, with new ice blocks covering the ground.

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A NASA spacecraft revisiting Martian sites it first documented over a decade ago has captured the stunning transformation in one region caused by an avalanche of ice. The instrument has been revisiting areas it photographed in 2006-2007 so scientists can track the changes

A NASA spacecraft revisiting Martian sites it first documented over a decade ago has captured the stunning transformation in one region caused by an avalanche of ice. The instrument has been revisiting areas it photographed in 2006-2007 so scientists can track the changes

‘One of the most actively changing areas on Mars are the steep edges of the North Polar layered deposit,’ NASA explains.

The new image captures far more detail than the older shot, with a scale of 25 centimeters (9.8 inches) per pixel, compared to the original 31.9 centimeters (12.6 inches) per pixel.

While the earlier image shows a much smoother surface, the new shot captured by the HiRISE instrument shows a landscape dotted in new ice blocks.

The instrument has been revisiting areas it photographed in 2006-2007 so scientists can track the changes.

‘This long baseline allows us to see large, rare changes as well as many smaller changes.’

The new image captures far more detail than the older shot, with a scale of 25 centimeters (9.8 inches) per pixel, compared to the original 31.9 centimeters (12.6 inches) per pixel. While the earlier image (above) shows a much smoother surface, the new shot captured by the HiRISE instrument shows a landscape dotted in new ice blocks

The new image captures far more detail than the older shot, with a scale of 25 centimeters (9.8 inches) per pixel, compared to the original 31.9 centimeters (12.6 inches) per pixel. While the earlier image (above) shows a much smoother surface, the new shot captured by the HiRISE instrument shows a landscape dotted in new ice blocks

Back in May, the European Space Agency released a stunning flythrough video that shows a glimpse into the geologic history of another region on Mars: the Neukum Crater.

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Neukum Crater is situated roughly 500 miles (800km) from Hellas, the

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