The 3D printed underwater jetpack that propels users at speeds of up to 8 miles ...

A university student has designed a futuristic underwater jetpack that can seamlessly propel you around a pool. 

As if that wasn't enough, the jetpack was made entirely using 3D printed materials. 

Archie O'Brien, a design student at Loughborough University in the UK, began building it as part of a student project. 

The CUDA underwater jetpack was conceived just one year ago, but could go on sale as soon as 2019.   

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Archie O'Brien, a design student at Loughborough University in the UK, began building the underwater jetpack (pictured) as part of a student project. It could go on sale as soon as 2019

HOW DID A STUDENT CREATE A 3D PRINTED JETPACK? 

A student from a UK university constructed a 3D printed jetpack.

It takes just minutest to assemble and can be worn as a backpack.

Called CUDA, the device can propel swimmers at speeds of up to 8mph. 

It's made up of 45 3D printed parts, apart from the drive shaft. 

The student created a unique propulsion system that makes it the 'fastest underwater jet pack in the world.' 

The jetpack can go up to 8mph, but users can adjust it manually, or even turn on a cruise control mode. 

O'Brien worked with 3D printing company 3D Hubs to build CUDA, which contains roughly 45 3D printed parts total. 

It can be assembled in less than 10 minutes under water, according to 3D Hubs.  

Even the device's impeller, or a rotating mechanism that powers the centrifugal pump, is made out of 3D printed material, further reinforced with carbon fiber that gives it the 'extreme stiffness needed for such parts.'

O'Brien originally wanted to shrink down a jet ski engine into a jetpack, but later devised a custom, compact propulsion system. 

'With its own patented propulsion system CUDA is the fastest Underwater Jetpack in the world, whilst remaining easily portable between dive sites,' Loughborough Design School noted. 

Even the device's impeller, or a rotating mechanism that powers the centrifugal pump, is made out of 3D printed material, further reinforced with carbon fiber that gives it 'stiffness' 

Even the device's impeller, or a rotating mechanism that powers the centrifugal pump, is made out of 3D printed material, further reinforced with carbon fiber that gives it 'stiffness' 

O'Brien originally wanted to shrink down a jet ski engine into a jetpack, but devised a custom, compact propulsion system. They claim it's the fastest Underwater Jetpack in the world

O'Brien originally wanted to shrink down a jet ski engine into a jetpack, but devised a custom, compact propulsion system. They claim it's the fastest Underwater Jetpack in the world

CUDA operates similar to a jet ski, in that it sucks in water and shoots it out through a rear funnel at higher speeds, according to Gizmodo.

Users wear the jetpack like a backpack and only have to point their body in the direction they want to swim toward. 

To control the speed, users operate a hand held trigger system. 

'Steering is similar to an airplane, as you need a certain amount of speed before you can effectively turn,' 3D Hubs explained. 

A detachable lithium ion battery pack is built into the device, which allows for 'continuous use.' 

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CUDA operates similar to a jet ski, in that it sucks in water and shoots it out through a rear funnel at higher speeds. To control the speed, users operate a hand held trigger system

CUDA also much cheaper than traditional underwater propulsion technology, which can cost as much as $17,000, however, O'Brien hasn't yet indicated what CUDA will be priced at

CUDA also much cheaper than traditional underwater propulsion technology, which can cost as much as $17,000, however, O'Brien hasn't yet indicated what CUDA will be priced at

O'Brien coated the parts with

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