How drought and an increasing population will change the way we'll eat

The days of sitting down and tucking in to a giant steak are on the way out, MasterChef judge Matt Preston says.

Mr Preston believes the plates of the future will be mainly plant-based, with small amounts of protein, mostly plankton and insects.

His comments come as a large chunk of Australia is in drought, including all of New South Wales, and an increasing population is eating in to farmland.

The days of tucking in to a giant steak are on the way out, MasterChef judge Matt Preston says, with plankton and insects the protein of the future 

The days of tucking in to a giant steak are on the way out, MasterChef judge Matt Preston says, with plankton and insects the protein of the future 

Plankton is already being used at international restaurants, including this plankton risotto dish (pictured) 

Plankton is already being used at international restaurants, including this plankton risotto dish (pictured) 

Mr Preston says insects are a protein source Australians should be using 'because they thrive here'. Pictured, edible fried insects 

Mr Preston says insects are a protein source Australians should be using 'because they thrive here'. Pictured, edible fried insects 

It has led to a national discussion on what food will be eaten in the future and where it will come from. 

Mr Preston shared his thoughts at an Ikea Democratic Design Days Future Food forum in Sydney on Wednesday, where he was part of a panel of speakers. 

'Seafood, plants - they're really the future. I think the days of eating a giant steak are on the way out,' he said. 

Mr Preston said there was already an international restaurant which had put a plankton risotto dish on the menu and it is 'delicious, absolutely delicious'. 

'Plankton, insects, they're the protein

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