Sister of man who claims he was sexually assaulted by George Pell in a swimming ...

Cardinal George Pell, 77, was found guilty of sexually assaulting two teenage choirboys inside St Patrick's Cathedral in Melbourne in December 1996. 

His trial lasted 24 days, most of which was heard in open court. The complainant's evidence was heard in closed court, meaning it cannot be reported on. 

Pell, Australia's top Catholic and the most senior church official to be charged with historical child sex crimes, will be sentenced on March 13. He is expected to launch an appeal immediately after.  

DAY ONE - Thursday November 8, 2018

Cardinal George Pell's retrial begins after a jury was unable to reach a unanimous verdict in September.

Prosecutors allege that after Sunday solemn mass at St Patrick's Cathedral in Melbourne, two choirboys sneaked away from the procession outside and re-entered the cathedral via a side door.

It is then claimed the two boys entered a priest's sacristy, where they started swigging at the sacramental wine, before being 'caught' by Pell.

It is then alleged that the newly installed archbishop of the Melbourne diocese, still in his ornamental robes, sexually assaulted the pair.

Pell's defence team argues the Cardinal has been unfairly targeted by media, which 'portrayed him as the Darth Vader of the Catholic Church'.

DAYS TWO TO FOUR

Court is closed to the media and public while the complainant gives evidence.

DAY FIVE - Wednesday November 14

Jury, made of eight men and four women, is taken to St Patrick's Cathedral in Melbourne to see the sacristy where Pell is accused of orally raping the complainant and molesting another child.

Two former choirboys gave pre-recorded evidence claiming after mass, with one telling the court the choirboys would get changed and go home, but would interact with Pell, who was always robed on Sundays, before mass, and the other saying he could not recall Pell being alone after Sunday solemn mass.

Pictured: The priest's sacristy at St Patrick's Cathedral in Melbourne, where Cardinal George Pell is alleged to have sexually assaulted two boys in 1996

Pictured: The priest's sacristy at St Patrick's Cathedral in Melbourne, where Cardinal George Pell is alleged to have sexually assaulted two boys in 1996

DAY SIX - Thursday November 15

Former choirmaster and organist, John Mallinson, 84, tells the court the master of ceremonies at the time, Monsignor Charles Portelli, was a 'stickler' and would have been very focused on keeping control of the choir's exit.

He said he had seen Pell returning to his sacristy following mass 'probably frequently', but said he was usually accompanied by Monsignor Portelli or Dean William McCarthy.

DAY SEVEN - Friday November 16

Organist Geoffrey Cox told the court there was a 'regimented and disciplined' procedure for choristers after mass at the cathedral, and there was 'no deviation'.

Mr Cox said if a chorister was running late back to the rehearsal room after mass, they would have to ring a bell and someone would let them in.

'But that didn't really happen at all,' he said.

DAY EIGHT - Monday November 19

Sacristan Max Potter, who was in charge of the sacristy at St Patrick's, concedes it is possible Pell was alone during the times the choirboys said they were molested, and that sacramental wine, which the boys claimed to have been drinking before they were assaulted, was sometimes left out between masses.

Choirmaster Peter Michael Finnigan said the boys would have been in the front third of the procession when leaving the mass, making it hard for them to escape unnoticed, but as there was no roll-call after the mass, it is possible they had done it.

DAY NINE - Tuesday November 20

Mr Potter, the sacristan, explained the elaborate robes Pell would have been wearing for the service made it only 'inhumanly possible' for the then-Archbishop to have exposed himself through the robes.

Monsignor Charles Portelli told the court he could only remember two occasions over five years where he had not assisted Pell with his robing and disrobing, but noted he had been using the priest's sacristy, where the offending is alleged to have taken place, not the archbishop's sacristy, to dress.

DAY 10 - Wednesday November 21

Former chorister David Dearing said the procession lines the choir left the church in got 'a bit rowdy' once the group was out of public view, and it was 'game on to get out of there and go home'.

Another former choirboy, Anthony Nathan, said in his time in the choir, which was during the period of offending, he had only seen a boy leave the procession lines once, to rush to the bathroom to be sick.

Neither could recall seeing or hearing about anyone ever sneaking away from the line unnoticed.

DAY 11 - Thursday November 22

Two older members of the choir, who would have been behind the two boys when they 'nicked off' from the processional lines to drink wine in the sacristy, told the court they would have seen the pair, and did not remember having done so.

Rodney Dearing said the boys would have been spotted, but had earlier admitted the choristers would bunch up as they neared a point at a rear building.

'I couldn't see half the choir,' he said.

Pell, who was until now Australia's top Catholic, was the Archbishop of Melbourne at the time of the offending, and celebrating  mass at St Patrick's  (pictured)

Pell, who was until now Australia's top Catholic, was the Archbishop of Melbourne at the time of the offending, and celebrating  mass at St Patrick's  (pictured)

DAY 12 - Friday November 23

Former St Patrick's Cathedral choirboy Christopher Doyle testifies while the procession of boys leaving the church after mass became more relaxed out of public view it would be tricky for anyone to slip away unnoticed.

Mr Doyle said he 'never' saw anyone leave

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