Sydney tradie who fled to fight for ISIS begs Australia to allow his wife and ...

A Sydney tradesman who travelled to Syria to join ISIS in 2015 and is being held in a Kurdish camp has begged the government to let him and his family come back.

Mohammed Noor Masri, 26, told The Sydney Morning Herald he wants to get his Australian pregnant wife Shayma Assaad and the couple's three boys out of Syria.

'[I feel] remorseful, regretful. I mean, people make mistakes. And you have to pay the price for your mistake,' Mr Masri said.

Mohammed Noor Masri, 26, (pictured) said he wants to get his Australian pregnant wife Shayma Assaad and their three boys one out of Syria

Mohammed Noor Masri, 26, (pictured) said he wants to get his Australian pregnant wife Shayma Assaad and their three boys one out of Syria

There are more than 2,500 displaced children from families with perceived or actual associations with ISIS living in camps (similar to al-Hol camp pictured) in North East Syria

There are more than 2,500 displaced children from families with perceived or actual associations with ISIS living in camps (similar to al-Hol camp pictured) in North East Syria

The 26-year-old said he was prepared to face a lengthy jail term in Australia for his 'mistake' if allowed to return with his family. 

He said he would prefer to be prosecuted in Australia or under international law, which recognises such things as 'human rights'. 

According to Masri, he surrendered to Kurdish forces at Baghouz - a former IS stronghold in eastern Syria - about a month ago. 

The airconditioning service tradesman claimed he didn't fight for ISIS but rather worked in a hospital where he maintained refrigerators and airconditioning units. 

His situation highlights the challenge for the Morrison government faces after being pressured to repatriate Australian ISIS extremists for prosecution.

There are more than 2,500 displaced children from families with perceived or actual associations with ISIS living in camps in North East Syria, Save the Children states.  

But the Australian government has repeatedly said it is not prepared to change its stance on dealing with such people as far from the country as possible. 

In the interview, Masri claimed he stuck to his profession while living under the Islamic State and was never involved in killing, assaulting or enslaving anyone.

A German woman, living in al-Hol camp which houses relatives of Islamic State (IS) group members

A German woman, living in al-Hol camp which houses relatives of Islamic State (IS) group members

Fighters from the al-Qaida linked Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), now called the Islamic State group, marching in Raqqa, Syria

Fighters from the al-Qaida linked Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), now called the Islamic State group, marching in Raqqa, Syria

'I didn't see any heads or severed bodies and stuff like that. I wasn't the type of person to be running around the shops too much ... and I don't like to see beheadings. I don't like to see those sort of scenes. Nor do I agree with it,' he said. 

He told the publications he has since accepted he was mislead into joining an organisation he considers to be 'evil'.

Masri claimed he travelling to Syria not as a terrorist but as an inquisitive albeit misguided person seeking to learn more about Islam.

His claims are based on the notion he was ignorant to the highly publicised and well-known brutality the organisation has previously been associated with. 

Australians begging to come home after fighting with ISIS 

Oliver Bridgeman, 21

Olive Bridgeman, 21, (pictured) claims he went to Syria to be a humanitarian worker.

Olive Bridgeman, 21, (pictured) claims he went to Syria to be a humanitarian worker.

The 21-year-old from Toowoomba in Queensland's Darling Downs claimed he travelled to Syria to be a humanitarian worker. He previously assured his mother and father he hadn't been fighting in the war-torn nation, where ISIS terrorists are battling for control.   His passport has been cancelled by the Australian government and he has been stuck in the war-torn area since 2016. 

Mahir Absar Alam, 26, 

Mahir Absar Alam, 26, (pictured), was caught just outside Baghouz.

Mahir Absar Alam, 26, (pictured), was caught just outside Baghouz.

Alam joined Islamic State just four weeks after it declared its so-called caliphate in 2014. He has allegedly expressed regret for joining. 

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