RT @cnni: HAPPENING NOW: British MPs are voting on four Brexit options. They ...

RT @cnni: HAPPENING NOW: British MPs are voting on four Brexit options. They ...
RT @cnni: HAPPENING NOW: British MPs are voting on four Brexit options. They ...
4 min ago HAPPENING NOW: Lawmakers vote on Brexit alternatives

British MPs are voting on four Brexit options, in the second round of indicative votes that could find a way out of the country's political deadlock. They have 30 minutes to cast their ballots.

There are four options, and MPs can vote on as many as they like:

Motion C, Customs Union -- This motion calls on the government to ensure that the Brexit plan includes a permanent and comprehensive UK-wide customs union with the EU.

Motion D, Common Market 2.0 -- This proposal wants the Political Declaration -- which covers the future relationship between the UK and the EU -- to be renegotiated so that the UK joins the European Free Trade Association, through which it retains its membership of the European Economic Area, or Single Market. The UK would also seek to negotiate a "comprehensive customs arrangement" with the EU.

Motion E, Confirmatory public vote -- Parliament would not be allowed to ratify any Brexit deal until it has been confirmed by a referendum.

Motion G, Parliamentary Supremacy -- This motion has a series of actions. If the no withdrawal agreement has been agreed by noon on April 10, the UK must seek a delay to Brexit from the bloc. If the EU does not agree to a further extension, then government must allow MPs to choose between leaving without a deal and revoking Article 50, which would scrap the Brexit process altogether.

9 min ago DUP abstaining on all four Brexit alternatives

The DUP's Westminster leader Sammy Wilson.

The DUP's Westminster leader Sammy Wilson.DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images

Northern Ireland’s Democratic Unionist Party will not support any of the four alternative Brexit options before the House of Commons on Monday night.

Sammy Wilson, the group's Westminster leader, gave two reasons for the widely-expected decision: “one, because they do not safeguard the issue of the union, and two, because they do not deliver on Brexit.”

Theresa May's minority Conservative government relies on the party for its House of Commons majority, but their opposition to the controversial backstop has frustrated her attempts to pass her Brexit Withdrawal Agreement.

10 min ago "If you are part of it, you need to be part of everything"

From CNN's Sebastian Shukla in Winchester, England

Winchester cathedral.

Winchester cathedral.CNN

Winchester, a British town steeped in history dating back to King Alfred, is famed for boasting Europe's largest cathedral and one of the UK country’s oldest boarding schools.

In June 2016, its residents voted by 58% to remain in the European Union. But like most parts of the United Kingdom, Winchester is still split on what path to take from here.

In the shadows of the cathedral, Jack Briggs, 60, a consultant, tells CNN that he and his wife voted to leave. It was about “getting control back on legislation, and border controls," says Briggs, who was raised in upstate New York but is now a British citizen.

"We will be better off in the long run,” Briggs says, though he admits there will be a rocky patch to navigate first. "Maybe holding a second referendum wouldn’t be so bad, but from a democratic point of view, we are bound to stay the course.”

Ian, a 29-year-old who works in IT for the local council and voted to remain, says "the idea of a soft Brexit is totally ridiculous -- you are either in or you are out."

"If you are part of it, you need to be part of everything."

On the issue of Britain’s position within the EU, he adds: “we hold more power than people realise. We have just given up our power, and that is a bit of a shame.”

Last week, Steve Brine, the MP for Winchester, quit his post as a government minister to back parliament taking control of Brexit.

Having spent last week reporting from Kingston, Bath, North East Somerset and now Winchester, one thing is increasingly clear to me: these areas may have voted to remain, but there is growing sentiment that people want Westminster to get on with making a decision.  

31 min ago Labour Party is backing three of four alternative Brexit options
DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images

The opposition Labour Party is whipping in support of three indicative vote options tonight, its shadow Brexit Secretary has confirmed in the House of Commons.

Keir Starmer said MPs will support both customs union plans and a second, confirmatory referendum -- but not the no-deal vs revoke Article 50 option put forward by the Scottish National Party's Joanna Cherry.

“Our focus today is the way forward, which is why we are supporting the three amendments in place,” he said. "Labour has long supported a customs union, it is a vital component of any deal that will protect manufacturing."

On the plan for a second referendum, Starmer said: "At this late stage, it's now clear that any Brexit deal agreed in this Parliament would need further democratic approval."

He added that the plan "would ensure that any Tory Brexit deal is subject to a referendum lock."

1 hr 13 min ago 12 naked protesters arrested in UK Parliament

The twelve semi-nude protesters who stripped off in the House of Commons viewing gallery have been removed and arrested, allowing MPs taking part in the Brexit debate to get back to nitpicking the finer points of a customs union in peace.

The activists had glued themselves to the glass that separates the chamber from the public, in a cheeky stunt which drew the attention of several lawmakers.

"It has long been a thoroughly British trait to be able to ignore pointless nakedness, and I trust the House will be able to return to the issue that we are discussing," Nick Boles told the Commons.
2 hr 3 min ago Semi-naked protesters distract MPs in Commons

While lawmakers debate indicative votes, they're having to battle a fairly significant distraction.

About a dozen climate protesters stripped down and pressed themselves against the glass of the viewing gallery that overlooks the Commons. It's an inventive way to make a point, and it's received the attention of several MPs.

The climate group Extinction Rebellion

that they were responsible. (Warning: some readers may find the photographs explicit.)

John Bercow, the Speaker, has asked MPs to press on.

2 hr 35 min ago The Brexit motions that made the cut -- and the ones that didn't
Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

The Speaker has selected four motions for MPs to cast their ballots on later, and they won't make happy reading for the government. Two of them favor a so-called soft Brexit, one calls for a second referendum, and a fourth would give lawmakers a vote on revoking Article 50, the legal process by which the UK is leaving the EU.

There was some question over whether both Customs Union motions would be chosen. Motion C, the "pure" Customs Union plan, came the closest to securing a majority of MPs last week, losing by just six votes. But Motion D, which calls for membership of a Customs Union and the Single Market, has picked up plenty of buzz on Monday and has a real chance to succeed after Labour and the SNP said they'd back it.

Those advocating for a second referendum will be pleased to see Motion E get the go-ahead. That plan calls for any eventual Brexit deal to be put to a confirmatory referendum, against the option of remaining in the EU.

It's a call Labour has backed in recent weeks, and could provide Theresa May a way of getting her Withdrawal Agreement through the House of Commons.

Motion G is a new twist on a plan that was put forward last week. It gives MPs the chance to cancel Brexit -- but for over-excited Remainers, there's a catch.

In the event that the EU denies the UK a longer Brexit delay on April 10, the motion allows for Parliament to have an eleventh-hour vote between leaving with no deal or revoking Article 50. If you've been enjoying the soap opera that is Brexit, that would provide quite the series finale.

What was rejected: A plan to amend the Withdrawal Agreement to remove the controversial backstop -- which has been explicitly ruled out by both the EU and Theresa May -- wasn't taken forward. The Speaker noted that the European Union has rejected this course of action.

Also rejected as a motion that called for a no-deal Brexit in the event that a Withdrawal Agreement isn't passed by April 12. The Speaker explained that he rejected that plan because it essentially sets out the legal default option, and noted that it was overwhelmingly rejected last week.

A motion calling for a so-called People's Vote if a no-deal Brexit became likely was also ruled out, meaning that the hopes of those wanting to see a second referendum will hinge on Motion E alone.

The final rejected plan called for the UK to enter the European Economic Area and indicate an intention to rejoin the European Free Trade Association after Brexit.

3 hr 5 min ago BREAKING: Four motions chosen for tonight's votes

John Bercow, the Speaker of the House of Commons, has just announced the indicative vote motions that MPs will be voting on tonight.

He's chosen four from a list of eight. They are:

Motion C, Customs Union -- This motion calls on the government to ensure that the Brexit plan includes a permanent and comprehensive UK-wide customs union with the EU.

Motion D, Common Market 2.0 -- This proposal wants the Political Declaration -- which covers the future relationship between the UK and the EU -- to be renegotiated so that the UK joins the European Free Trade Association, through which is retains its membership of the European Economic Area, or Single Market. The UK would also seek to negotiate a "comprehensive customs arrangement" with the EU.

Motion E, Confirmatory public vote -- Parliament would not be allowed to ratify any Brexit deal until it has been confirmed by a referendum.

Motion G, Parliamentary Supremacy -- This motion has a series of actions. If the no withdrawal agreement has been agreed by noon on April 10, the UK must seek a delay to Brexit from the bloc. If the EU does not agree to a further extension, then government must allow MPs to choose between leaving without a real and revoking Article 50, which would scrap the Brexit process altogether.

3 hr 13 min ago Brexiteer changes mind on May's deal -- again

Conservative MP and hardline Brexiteer Richard Drax has apologized in the Commons for supporting Theresa May's Brexit deal last week.

He confirmed he'll be switching to oppose the deal if it's put forward a fourth time – having switched to supporting it on Friday.

"I do not feel I have misled the House, but I do feel I have not been true to myself," Drax said. "Although doing what I believed to be in the country's best interests at that moment in time, I quickly realized that I should not have voted with the Government on Friday afternoon."

Drax also apologized to the DUP, who have been firm in their opposition to the Withdrawal Agreement, for his "wrong call." He added that he will now return to supporting a no-deal Brexit.

"The Withdrawal Agreement as it stands

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