Massachusetts teacher breaks down the slang his students use by creating a ...

A teacher has come up with a novel way to bridge the generation gap by sharing a dictionary of teenage slang used by his students.

James Callahan from Lowell High School in Massachusetts created a spreadsheet of all the colloquial terms his students have used since September along with his attempt to explain them.

On Monday, one of Callahan's students, Twitter user @Mewtailv2,

a photo of a four-page document the sociology teacher created, titled the 'Callahan's Generation Z Dictionary.'

Within days, the tweet went viral, receiving over 565,000 likes and 163,069 retweets as of Thursday night.

James Callahan, (pictured center),  from Lowell High School in Massachusetts created a spreadsheet of all the colloquial terms his students have used since September along with his attempt to explain them

James Callahan, (pictured center),  from Lowell High School in Massachusetts created a spreadsheet of all the colloquial terms his students have used since September along with his attempt to explain them

James Callahan from Lowell High School in Massachusetts created a spreadsheet of all the colloquial terms his students have used since September along with his attempt to explain them. One of his students tweeted the spreadsheet and it has gone viral

James Callahan from Lowell High School in Massachusetts created a spreadsheet of all the colloquial terms his students have used since September along with his attempt to explain them. One of his students tweeted the spreadsheet and it has gone viral 

Callahan, who teaches sociology, told USA TODAY: 'I often overhear students in the hallways or my classrooms using words (or) slang terms in their personal conversations.

'In order to understand them better, (and) make a connection with them on a personal level, I started asking them what certain words meant.'

In an alphabetized green-colored column, the teacher typed out phrases like 'sis,'  'spill the tea'  and 'snack.'

In the yellow column, he attempts to define each phrase using a formal interpretation of what the students say on a daily basis. 

He claimed 'sis' means 'exclamation of disbelief',

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