Hertfordshire farmer wins bitter court battle to stop her late brother’s ...

sonos sonos One (Gen 2) - Voice Controlled Smart Speaker with Amazon Alexa Built-in - Black read more

Farmer Sally Kingsley (pictured) has won a legal battle with her dead brother's widow over historic £3.2 million country estate, which was once at the centre the grisly 'Jigsaw Murder' in 2009

Farmer Sally Kingsley (pictured) has won a legal battle with her dead brother's widow over historic £3.2 million country estate, which was once at the centre the grisly 'Jigsaw Murder' in 2009

A farmer has won a legal battle with her dead brother's widow over historic £3.2 million country estate which was once at the centre of a grisly murder.  

The High Court ruled in favour of Sally Kingsley, 67, to keep Lodge Farm near Buntingford, after her sister-in-law Karim Kingsley, 51, wanted to sell the land for the best price on the market.

In 2009, the 287-acre farm, in Hertfordshire, was at the centre of a murder investigation when the late landowner Roger Kingsley found a severed leg in a hedgerow.    

The limb belonged to salesman Jeffrey Howe whose body parts were scattered across the countryside by killer Stephen Marshall in the high-profile 'Jigsaw Man' murder case.  

Mr Kingsley, who handled the physical side of the farm, died in 2015 after a battle with cancer, aged 57, which sparked a High Court battle between his widow and sister, who managed the estate's books.

After a High Court battle a judge has ruled in Sally's right to the estate, which has been in the Kingsley family for since the mid-19th century.

Judge Lance Ashworth QC said that the evidence showed that the late Mr Kingsley had wanted the land to continue 'to be farmed by members of the Kingsley family after his death'.

Sally's sister-in-law Karim Kingsley, 51, (pictured) wanted to sell her share of the 287-acre farm for the best price on the market, which she inherited from her late husband

Sally's sister-in-law Karim Kingsley, 51, (pictured) wanted to sell her share of the 287-acre farm for the best price on the market, which she inherited from her late husband

Judge Ashworth added that selling the farm on the open market would 'result in the loss of Sally's livelihood', which the siblings had worked on together for decades. 

The family partnership ended with Roger's death, but Sally was adamant she wanted to keep running the nearly 200-year-old estate, which has been in her family since the mid-19th century.

The sisters-in-law fell out over the future of the land when Karim wanted to sell her half of the estate, which she had inherited from her husband.  

Sally, who owns the other half of the land, said that could result in the farm being lost

read more from dailymail.....

Get the latest news delivered to your inbox

Follow us on social media networks

NEXT SEC fines blockchain company Block.one $24 million over coin offering