UK weather: SNOW, rain and frost could make May Day Bank Holiday the coldest ...

Two weeks ago, the nation was slapping on the sun cream over a bank holiday weekend - but, this time, we are just as likely to be reaching for our winter woollies.

After record-breaking Easter heat, Britons have been warned to expect a chilly feel to this bank holiday weekend, with temperatures in many areas only just reaching double figures, and the chance of sharp frosts and even snow.

Forecasters predict an east-west divide, with sunshine and showers in the East and fine conditions elsewhere. But even the South may struggle to reach 12C (54F) this weekend, while Scotland could fall to –5C (23F) overnight.

A BMW 328 car drives on the A939 near Tomintoul in Moray today after there was a dusting of fresh snow overnight

A BMW 328 car drives on the A939 near Tomintoul in Moray today after there was a dusting of fresh snow overnight

Daffodils are pictured this morning at the side of the A939 near Tomintoul, which is one of Scotland's highest villages

Daffodils are pictured this morning at the side of the A939 near Tomintoul, which is one of Scotland's highest villages

A car drives past a house on the A939 near Tomintoul in Scottish Highlands today which has had a dusting of fresh snow

A car drives past a house on the A939 near Tomintoul in Scottish Highlands today which has had a dusting of fresh snow 

In the North East of England, a maximum of 9C (48F) is likely tomorrow, rising to 10C (50F) on Sunday. The daytime average for the start of May is around 16C (61F).

Frosts are possible in parts of the Pennines and Welsh mountains, where temperatures could fall as low as -3C (27F) tonight and tomorrow night. Higher overnight temperatures of 3C (37F) to 5C (41F) are forecast elsewhere. 

The lowest temperature ever recorded on the early May bank holiday weekend was -6.4C (20.5F) in Grantown-on-Spey in 1981 and then again in Kinbrace in 1988 - a figure that could be beaten this weekend in Scotland.

It will be a stark contrast to 2018, when the mercury hit 28.7C (83.6F) at RAF Northolt in West London, making it the hottest early May bank holiday Monday and weekend since records began. 

The chill is being caused by an area of high pressure, set to drag a mass of Arctic air southwards. The Met Office said today will be 'cloudy for many, with showery rain moving slowly southwards across England and Wales'.

Tomorrow will see a cold and frosty start for many with possible heavy showers for the Midlands and South East, and a risk of hail. Sunday is set to be dry except for showers in the North East, which will continue into Monday.

Andy Page, Met Office chief meteorologist, said: 'After cold, frosty starts and cool days for many across the Bank Holiday weekend, daytime temperatures will gradually recover early next week, however they will not come near the high values we saw over the Easter

read more from dailymail.....

Get the latest news delivered to your inbox

Follow us on social media networks

NEXT Beauty makeover: Elizabeth Holmes gets a fresh blow-out while dialing back on ...