Scott Morrison and his team wear hi-vis on their visit to Sydney Markets

Prime Minister Scott Morrison visited the Sydney Markets on Thursday as he tried to grab voters' attention ahead of Saturday's election - and he certainly caught the eye. 

Mr Morrison and his wife Jenny were seen mingling with local vendors, browsing the shops and even sampling produce on Thursday morning at the Homebush facility in the city's inner west. 

But it was the PM's attire - rather than his policies - that sparked debate.

Some were quick to criticise the decision to force the prime minister to wear a high-vis jacket at the market. 

The commercial facility, which stocks fruit, vegetables, produce, fish and other goods for restaurants and vendors, requires guests to dress wear safety gear as part of their protocol. 

Scott Morrison and his wife Jenny visited the Sydney Markets making his final pitch to voters ahead of this weekend's federal election

Scott Morrison and his wife Jenny visited the Sydney Markets making his final pitch to voters ahead of this weekend's federal election

Critics were quick to blast the decision to force the prime minister to wear safety gear at a market

Critics were quick to blast the decision to force the prime minister to wear safety gear at a market

The prime minister and his wife Jenny were seen mingling with local vendors, browsing the shops and even sampling produce on Thursday morning at the facility in the city's inner west

The prime minister and his wife Jenny were seen mingling with local vendors, browsing the shops and even sampling produce on Thursday morning at the facility in the city's inner west

Politicians appear to be no exception to that rule, as opposition leader Bill Shorten was also seen sporting a vest during his appearance at the market last month.  

Imre Salusinszky, the former media director for former NSW Premier Mike Baird, took to Twitter to criticise the system saying there should be exceptions to the rule.

'It appears that, however powerful you are in this country, you are not powerful enough to say to lowly officials—"No, I am not wearing ridiculous safety gear on this visit,"' he tweeted on Thursday morning. 

Mr Salusinzky told Daily Mail Australia the policy represents the 'petty officialdom' in the country. 

'I can imagine places a politician goes where there could be injury, but when a visit has been prepared for weeks... it's sometimes just utterly ridiculous to think an accident is going to happen,' he said. 

'What are the chances that Scott Morrison is walking through the markets, where there are journalists and cameras following him around...what kind of forklift driver is going to mow him down?' 

Mr Salusinzky recalled his own experiences on the campaign trail when Mr Baird's team was required to change into safety gear before a public appearance at a new Sydney light rail station. 

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