Thousands of Muslims gather in Sydney mosques to celebrate the end of Ramadan

Hundreds of Muslims cram into a Sydney mosque and spill onto the streets as they celebrate the end of Ramadan by praying and breaking their fasts Muslim worshippers crammed into a Sydney mosque to celebrate the end of Ramadan with Eid-al-Fitr  Men, women and children flocked to Lakemba mosque, in Sydney's west, to give thanks and commemorate The wet weather didn't put a dampener on festivities, with crowds spilling out onto the base of the steps 

By Brittany Chain For Daily Mail Australia

Published: 03:54 BST, 5 June 2019 | Updated: 05:33 BST, 5 June 2019

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Muslim worshippers have crammed into a Sydney mosque to celebrate the end of Ramadan with the Eid-al-Fitr festival.

Men, women and children flocked to Lakemba mosque in Sydney's west to give thanks and commemorate the end of their month-long fast.

The wet weather didn't put a dampener on festivities, with crowds spilling out onto the base of the steps at the mosque after it reached capacity. 

The men braved the rain on Wednesday to give the traditional prayer of thanks to signify the completion of Ramadan.

During Ramadan, Muslims fast during daylight hours and use the month as a period of introspection and communal prayer. 

The wet weather didn't put a dampener on festivities, with crowds spilling out onto the base of the steps at the mosque after it reached capacity

The wet weather didn't put a dampener on festivities, with crowds spilling out onto the base of the steps at the mosque after it reached capacity

Muslim worshippers have crammed into a Sydney mosque to celebrate the end of Ramadan with the Eid-al-Fitr festival

Muslim worshippers have crammed into a Sydney mosque to celebrate the end of Ramadan with the Eid-al-Fitr festival

During Ramadan, Muslims fast during daylight hours and use the month as a period of introspection and communal prayer

During Ramadan, Muslims fast during daylight hours and use the month as a period of introspection and communal prayer 

The Eid-al-Fitr is one of only two major festivals in the Islamic faith and sees Muslims give money to the poor and needy as an obligatory act of charity

The Eid-al-Fitr is one of only two major festivals in the Islamic faith and sees Muslims give money to the poor and needy as an obligatory act of charity

Muslims around the world celebrate the holy month of Ramadan by praying during the night time and abstaining from eating, drinking, and sexual acts during the period between sunrise and sunset

Muslims around the world

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