Honduran teen, 19, who fell under wheels of Mexico freight train

A 19-year-old Honduran migrant was pictured running alongside a freight train dubbed 'The Beast' in Mexico just hours before she died when she fell under its wheels and was cut in half. 

Local officials confirmed that Saily Yasmín Andino Andino was killed last week when she was dragged 100 yards near the Tabasco state town of Tacotalpa in Mexico's south-east.

The young woman was wearing bright red tennis shoes when she was pictured running alongside the freight train when it pulled out near Salto de Agua in Mexico's southernmost state of Chiapas.  

Hours later and about 27 miles to the west, the train stopped near the town of Tacotalpa and Andino hopped off to buy some cheese-stuffed rolls.

When the train crowded with migrants began to move again, she hustled to clamber back aboard. 

Local officials confirmed that Saily Yasmín Andino Andino was killed last week when she was dragged 100 yards near the Tabasco state town of Tacotalpa in Mexico's south-east. She is pictured running alongside the train dubbed The Beast

Local officials confirmed that Saily Yasmín Andino Andino was killed last week when she was dragged 100 yards near the Tabasco state town of Tacotalpa in Mexico's south-east. She is pictured running alongside the train dubbed The Beast

The little-noticed death of the 19-year-old Honduran added to a notorious toll claimed over the years by a train known as 'The Beast' - a perilous stage on the migrant journey from Central America to the U.S. border

The little-noticed death of the 19-year-old Honduran added to a notorious toll claimed over the years by a train known as 'The Beast' - a perilous stage on the migrant journey from Central America to the U.S. border

But the train suddenly stopped and rolled back causing her to lose her grip and fall beneath its wheels. 

It dragged her 100 yards before jerking forward again in a thunder of shuddering steel.

Frank Manuel Murillo, a 27-year-old Honduran who spent half his life in Houston before being deported a year ago, had also gotten off the train to buy some water. 

'When I turned around she was hanging from those wagons on the train,' he said Wednesday. 

'The train was running back, it hit so hard and she fell on the rails and then it cut her in half.'

'The people were screaming there. They yelled at those in front to stop, to the engine, but the engine accelerated,' said Catalina Leon Muñoz who lives alongside the tracks. 

The little-noticed death of the 19-year-old Honduran added to a notorious toll claimed over the years by a train known as 'The Beast' - a perilous stage on the migrant journey from Central America to the U.S. border.

Many migrants over the past year had tried to avoid such dangers by joining caravans of hundreds or thousands who trekked openly across southern Mexico. 

Others bought bus tickets - or had Mexicans buy tickets for them - and traveled in relative safety. But the government has pressured bus companies to require identification when the tickets were purchased and people boarded. Foreigners without papers were not allowed on.

The government's renewed crackdown on migration, spurred by threats of tariffs by U.S. President Donald , has pushed many back to more risky strategies, often involving smugglers who sometimes pack migrants perilously into ill-ventilated truck trailers.

Some, like Andino, risked a ride on the rattling train to advance though a remote stretch of southern Mexico with hopes of getting off and making their way by other means.

Central American migrants are seen in a boxcar of the freight train known as

Central American migrants are seen in a boxcar of the freight train known as "The Beast", during a pause on their journey towards the United States, in Ixtepec, Mexico on Sunday

Hundreds of migrants hoping to reach the United States boarded a freight train in southern Mexico late on Thursday, frustrated by efforts to slow their progress by the Mexican government, which is under pressure from President Trump

Hundreds of migrants hoping to reach the United States boarded a freight train in southern Mexico late on Thursday, frustrated by efforts to slow their progress by the Mexican government, which is under pressure from President

The risky move to board the train, known as 'La Bestia' (The Beast), followed a mass breakout of migrants from a holding center in the southern border city of Tapachula on Thursday night

The risky move to board the train, known as 'La Bestia' (The Beast), followed a mass breakout of migrants from a holding center in the southern border city of Tapachula on Thursday night

Men, women and children from various countries boarded the slow train as it pulled out of the town of Arriaga in the southern state of Chiapas, Mexican media reported. Migration authorities said at least 395 people had boarded the train

Men, women and children from various countries boarded the slow train as it pulled out of the town of Arriaga in the southern state of Chiapas, Mexican media reported. Migration authorities said at least 395 people had boarded the train

But Mexican officials this week moved to squeeze that off as well. About 100 soldiers and immigration agents raided a train on

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