How thousands of tourists have no idea about popular holiday island's dark ...

Aussie holiday island's dark past: How popular tourist destination was once home to an Aboriginal concentration camp where hundreds of men were chained together, tortured and killed Tourists flock to Rottnest Island, off the Western Australian coast, year round  The island has white sandy beaches, crystal waters and a little-known history More than 3,600 Aboriginal men were imprisoned on Island from 1838 to 1931 Hundreds of Aboriginal men died as a result of torture, execution and disease

By Kelsey Wilkie For Daily Mail Australia

Published: 05:53 BST, 22 July 2019 | Updated: 05:53 BST, 22 July 2019

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Thousands of tourists have been flocking to an Australian holiday hotspot unaware of its horrid past.

With its white sandy beaches, crystal waters and endless activities involving wildlife, Rottnest Island, off the coast of Western Australia, has become a top destination for adventurous holidaymakers.

But behind 'Perth's Island Playground' is a dark history.

Thousands of tourists have been flocking to an Australian holiday hotspot unaware of its horrid past (pictured are three women enjoying Rottnest Island)

Thousands of tourists have been flocking to an Australian holiday hotspot unaware of its horrid past (pictured are three women enjoying Rottnest Island)

Shocking images show dozens of emaciated men chained together, forced to live in the grim conditions

Shocking images show dozens of emaciated men chained together, forced to live in the grim conditions

More than 3,600 Aboriginal men were imprisoned on the Island from 1838 to 1931. 

Shocking images collected by the State Library of Victoria show dozens of emaciated men chained together, forced to live in the grim conditions.

Hundreds of Aboriginal men died as a result of torture, execution and disease at the prison. 

Despite it being Australia's largest mass burial site, it was still used as resort accommodation.

Holidaymakers would camp on the land that had the bones of 373 Aboriginal prisoners buried beneath until the site was closed in May last year.  

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