Democratic debate night 2: Fact-checking the candidates on the issues

Democratic debate night 2: Fact-checking the candidates on the issues originally appeared on abcnews.go.com

Here's ABC News' fact check of the second of two Democratic presidential debates in Detroit between Sen. Michael Bennet, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro, Sen. Cory Booker, former Vice President Joe Biden, Sen. Kamala Harris, Andrew Yang, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, Gov. Jay Inslee and Mayor Bill de Blasio.

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FACT CHECK | Harris: "Yeah, let's talk about math. Let's talk about the fact that the pharmaceutical companies and the insurance companies last year alone profited $72 billion on the backs of American families and understand you are your plan, status quo, you do nothing to hold the insurance companies to task for what they have been doing to American families and America today, a diabetes patient, one in four cannot afford their insulin."

PHOTO: Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., participates in the second of two Democratic presidential primary debate, July 31, 2019, in Detroit. (Paul Sancya/AP)

PHOTO: Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., participates in the second of two Democratic presidential primary debate, July 31, 2019, in Detroit. (Paul Sancya/AP)

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According to an analysis by Protect Our Care, a health care advocacy organization self-described as dedicated to preserving and improving the Affordable Care Act, the top eight drug company made profits in 2018 adding up to $50.3 billion. The eight largest publicly traded health insurers made a combined $21.9 billion in profits over the course of 2018, according to independent industry focused publication Modern Healthcare.

In 2018, Yale researchers reported that one-quarter of patients with type 1 or 2 diabetes reported using less insulin than prescribed due to these types of high costs.

-Jeffrey Cook

(MORE: Biden, Harris and Castro face-off in second night of Democratic debate)

FACT CHECK | Harris: "In America today, far too many people -- in fact 30 million people -- are going without access to health care."

Biden: "The senator had several plans so far and any time someone tells you you're going to get something good in 10 years, you should wonder why it takes 10 years. If you notice, there is no talk that the plan in 10 years will cost $3 trillion."

Harris: "Unfortunately, Vice President Biden, you're just simply inaccurate in what you're describing. The reality is that our plan will bring health care to all Americans under a Medicare-for-all system. Our plan will allow people to start signing up on the first day, babies will be born into our plan and right now, 4 million babies almost are born every day in America -- or every year in America -- under our plan, we will ensure everyone has access to health care. Your plan, by contrast, leaves out almost 10 million Americans."

On Wednesday night, the second Democratic debate kicked off with Harris and Biden sparring over health care. During the back-and-forth, Harris said that 30 million people go without access to health care. According to a National Center for Health Statistics 2018 survey, last year, 30.4 million people were uninsured at the time of the interview.

PHOTO: Democratic presidential hopefuls former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Kamala Harris speak during the second round of the second Democratic primary debate in Detroit, July 31, 2019. (Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

PHOTO: Democratic presidential hopefuls former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Kamala Harris speak during the second round of the second Democratic primary debate in Detroit, July 31, 2019. (Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

PHOTO: Democratic presidential hopefuls former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Kamala Harris speak during the second round of the second Democratic primary debate in Detroit, July 31, 2019. (Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

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Biden went on to criticize the cost of Harris' plan, which she has yet to put a price tag on. Biden initially said it would cost $3 trillion, but went back and corrected himself to say $30 trillion. According to a recent study by Charles Blahous -- the former the deputy director for the National Economic Council under the Bush administration -- at the free-market oriented Mercatus Center at George Mason University, a Medicare-for-All plan would cost an estimated $32.6 trillion over the first ten years of its implementation. Although Harris' plan is not the same as Sen. Bernie Sanders' plan, they both seek to establish universal coverage and refer to it as "Medicare For All."

Harris also pushed back against Biden's health care proposal -- stating that it would leave out almost 10 million Americans.Biden's proposal includes building on the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, which Republicans have vowed to repeal and continues to face ongoing court challenges. His plan would look to insure "more than an estimated 97% of Americans," according to his campaign website. That means that there would still be an estimated 3% of Americans who would not be covered -- which adds up to roughly 9.8 million people.

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-Sophie Tatum

(MORE: Fact-checking Democratic candidates on the issues after 1st night of debate)

FACT CHECK | Gillibrand: "President , under his administration, seven children died in his custody."

PHOTO: Democratic presidential hopeful Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand delivers her opening statement during the second round of the second Democratic primary debate in Detroit, July 31, 2019. (Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

PHOTO: Democratic presidential hopeful Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand delivers her opening statement during the second round of the second Democratic primary debate in Detroit, July 31, 2019. (Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

PHOTO: Democratic presidential hopeful Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand delivers her opening statement during the second round of the second Democratic primary debate in Detroit, July 31, 2019. (Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

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Gillibrand is correct that seven children have died after having been recently in U.S. custody. It's a point she also raised during the first Democratic debate in Miami. Most of them died after experiencing flu-like symptoms and being held at centers that immigration advocates have said were too crowded. One of those children, however, died from a congenital heart defect and her death was not tied to her care.

Mariee Juárez died last year after having spent time in ICE custody, but had been released. A 10-year-old died last fall after being in HHS custody, but due to a severe congenital heart defect. 16-year-old migrant boy dies after being in US custody for a week. A 2-year-old died in May after being diagnosed with pneumonia. Another 16-year-old died in April after experiencing symptoms resembling the flu. Last December, a 7-year-old girl, Jakelin Caal Maquin, and 8-year-old boy, Felipe Gomez Alonzo, both died of bacterial complications in separate incidents.

Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said in a Dec. 26 statement following the two children's deaths that "it has been more than a decade since CBP has had a child pass away in their custody." U.S. Border Patrol is a part of CBP, which is an agency within DHS.

-Anne Flaherty

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